Your Questions/My Answers: 2005

YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: That I know of 3 members of Fantomas are Aquarians, Patton, You, & Dave Lombardo...When is Buzzs' Burfday?

MY ANSWER:
He doesn't know. He was adopted by meth chefs in the 60s. He is a Jehovah's Witness and doesn't celebrate birthdays. He is waaaay older than me. He has multiple personalities and actually has several birthdays. He had a traumatic accident on his 3rd birthday and goes into a cold sweat if you sing the birthday song. He shares his birthday with Charles Manson, Hitler and John Tesh. He was born in a leap year so he's probably about 10 by now.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Chris Schurr
Comments: Great site, Why are there only 2 CDs for sale. What happened to the rest. Are you gonna get more copies of the other ones?

MY ANSWER:
Most of the stuff I have sold on the site is a limited number of copies that I was given or bought from various labels, none of which are wealthy enough to actually pay the artists. And I don't exactly sell enough records to reap in the royalties. When I sell out of my small supply that's it. Also, most of the other stuff is readily available from various websites and stores. I'm not really interested in trying to turn my site into a store. Ultimately this is just an info base.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Bryan
Comments: can i pee in your in your ear??flea was better bass player and will trevor jazz band tour with the red hot chili peppers once RHCP release their up coming "funk" album??? and will tevor be the "first day buyer" type person for new red hot chili peppers album????
also what trevor opinion on the TONY MARTIN era' of Black Sabbath??
what is your favorite KISS album????
do you like old school candian thrash metal??

MY ANSWER:
you will never get close enough to pee anywhere near me. Stop mentioning that stupid white band that does horrible cover versions of black musicians. I'm not sure what records fall under the "Tony Martin Era". I never really paid attention to producer names, dates, etc. But my favorite Sabbath record is Master of Reality for sure. My favorite Kiss album is probably Hotter Than Hell, or Dressed to Kill. OSCTM sucks.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: rich
Comments: Hey trev, i like ur bass in nicotina, tell me was it dunn(ha) on a 4 or 5 string bass, very tinny sounding. im a guitarist myself but im still interested as i can play it apart from the popped section, also track 10 on bowel of chili(E,F#,C#,C,,C#,C,E,G) DON T KNOW IF THE SONG HAS A NAME, but ur popping lines and bass playing is very inspirational!! in fact thinking about im gonna go play and its 1 in the morning!!!!!!! cheers matey..

MY ANSWER:
Dude, you are asking me about a song I wrote about 18 years ago. But I think the bass I had back then was some kind of Ibanez. Definitely a four-string. Probably the same bass I used on Bungle's first record. The other song you're talking about alludes me. Wow, I can't even believe people still like that demo. I think it sucks.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Darryl Jones
Comments: Hey trevor, are you looking for any new drummers to play with? I swear that I dont suck.

MY ANSWER:
I'm always looking for new people to play with. So, let's play.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Tom Mitchell
Comments: Nice site. Congratulations for keeping your world intact. Question: Can you expound at all on your musical realtionship with Danny Heifetz?

MY ANSWER:
Danny played in a band called Eggly Bagelface back in college. The rest of us, in Bungle, were big fans of that band. So when they sort of dissolved we asked him to join. I also played in the college big band with him. He's an amazing drummer. Very unique and under-appreciated I think. He was always very easy to play with. His feel is loose and swingy and he is always thinking of the larger musical picture. He can play in different styles, he can read and he can improvise. What more could you ask for? Plus he's a great writer as well. He wrote some stuff in Bungle but not enough as far as I was concerned. The two of us were always attentive to what the other was doing. Very much a "jazz rhythm section" mentality. He's also probably the funniest person I know. I miss playing with him.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
I'm searching for a suitable double-bass, only I'm left-handed...so my options as far as what I am able to sample are limited. My knowledge concerning the anatomy and temperment of the instrument is limited as well. What are a few things I should examine/expect when purchasing a new double-bass?

Also considering an EUB (for audibility @ shitty clubs and switching between electric & upright on-small stages) but every time I touch one I can't get over the absence of acoustic tone.
What have you gathered from your experience with EUB's?

I thought I would ask someone who's work I admire, as retailer and manufacturer opinions are biased.


MY ANSWER:
First of all, I believe you could adapt a right-handed bass. I think I would just be a matter of getting the correct bridge. As with any new instrument my first focus would be on the feel. How does the bass physically feel in your hands? You're going to be spending a lot of time with it so it should feel good from the beginning. It's always good to examine for cracks and previous repairs. Check around all the seams as well as the face,back and neck. Most of that stuff can be repaired pretty easily but pay attention to the neck and it's alignment. Ultimately you want the bass to be a nice, resonant, sturdy piece of wood. However, wood instruments change over time. And your bass will change with you in a way that depends on what kind of sound you are going for, and how you take care of the instrument. You can always make improvements, change the action, soundpost, etc. Try to take a bass you are considering home for a few days and see how it sits with you.

I don't know what an EUB is but if there is no acoustic tone than I would steer clear. Most of my struggles with live amplification have been in order to maintain as natural acoustic tone as possible.

Also, just so you know, I can't stand bringing both my upright and an electric to a gig. Total pain in the ass. Two different instruments, two different sounds, amp settings, techniques......It's really hard for me to focus on one or the other, so I only bring one or the other.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
thanks for the dead goon trans can you post more bungle tab? what are some of your favorite jazz recordings my favorite composer is mingus can you recomend more in that vain?
how do you feel about carole kayes index to pinky hole step interval approach as opposed to one finger per fret i see merit in kayes method for sight reading but it can be confusing when trying to teah a begining student fingering theory
thanks

MY ANSWER:
I doubt I will spend the time figuring out Bungle TABs unless someone pays me for it. Sorry. TAB is a pain in the ass for me anyway. I don't totally get it. I prefer traditional notation.

Yes, Mingus rules. Have you checked out the European bootlegs of his band in '65 (I think it was) with Eric Dolphy? Check out Dolphy, Andrew Hill, Cecil Taylor, Anthony Braxton, Tim Berne, Ellery Eskelin....

There are many fingering techniques that don't necessarily work together but I think it's important to give a new student something solid and unwavering to grasp on to. I certainly don't adhere strictly to the techniques that I teach but that's because I've figured out different ways to deal with different situations. I do, however, fall back on the one-finger-per-fret approach that I thoroughly believe in. I don't think there is any right or wrong technique. A lot of it has to do with a persons body, the shape of their hands, the length of their fingers, etc. With students, you sort of have to examine what their natural tendencies are while keeping them from developing bad habits or doing something that is going be physically damaging over time.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jorge
Comments: Hey Trevor, I saw Fantomas in 2002 at Stubbs in Austin and it was awesome, and then I saw you guys again last year in Austin but at an indoor club called Emo´s that is concrete floors and a very low cealing and it sounded like complete shit, levels uneven, Mike too loud, Dave and Buzz not heard, etc. Do you ever take into account how the acoustics of a room are gonna effect a live show when you guys set up? And what is up with the left to right drums guitar bass vocals positioning you guys do live? It goes against everything you are taught about live music performances (percussion in back, strings middle, voice up front). Picky as fuck I know.

MY ANSWER:
It's too bad that it sounded so shitty. We actually travel with our own sound engineer who tunes the PA at each venue just before soundcheck. He spends a lot of time dealing with whatever gear the club provides which is different every night, obviously. The concrete floor and low ceiling thing is a major factor though. There are a lot of venues out there that are acoustic nightmares and no matter how adept the engineer there is little hope. We try to make the most of it. Our sound guy has good nights and bad nights just like the musicians.

I think the whole purpose of Fantomas' stage set-up has to do with Mike's extensive use of visual queing. However, I agree with you and I've never been 100% into our set up. I'm way too far from Dave. That said, the music that Mike has written doesn't exactly fall into the traditional styles of academia. The bass parts aren't exactly bass parts, the guitar has a non-traditional roll, etc --especially in terms of "rock" music. Ok, I should shut up now before I get myself fired.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Naomi
Comments: Hi, apparently when you came to aus with sc3, my brother gave (well...sold) you a Hot Wheels shirt. Remember that? if not, ah well..thought it was worth a stab.
Anyway, is your music a direct reflection of your life at that time or are you able to 'fake it' and write something around that? Is that even possible?
thanks for making yourself accessible to fans! :) very much appreciated.

MY ANSWER:
Nope. That shirt thing never happened. I would love to own a Hot Wheels shirt. Well, maybe it did happen but the shirt didn't fit. Also, I was really stoned on that tour so I suppose anything is possible.

As far as your second question, I would say that the music I write is definitely a reflection of where my head is at whether I intend it as such or not. Life just has a way of seeping in everywhere. I'm not sure what you mean by "fake it" but I suppose that if I wanted to write something as a way of telling a story that didn't necessarily reflect my personal, boring, day-to-day life that I wouldn't consider that fake. I also feel that every single little note I play or write is full of the history of my life to this point. There is no way for me to escape that. Besides, I want to write music that has meaning. I'm not here to pump out a bunch of crap that doesn't mean anything to me.

And thank YOU for listening!
cheers


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Selwin
Comments: How do you feel about your contributions to Mr. Bungle alongside your band mates? By this I mean, do you look back and see the period as an accomplishment of your artistic vision of what a band (Or music in general) should sound like as a whole? I know compromise is a big part of being in a band, but do you feel more often than not that more was gained or lost in attempts at compromise and compilation? I'm afraid I seem to be digging towards some of the unspoken reasons behind the death of the group, but the question is really stemmed from my deep appreciation for the music. As a group, no band really continues to impress me to this day as MB does. And I'm curios: knowing you are; a person who can appreciate the composition of the music at least as much as I do (not to mention the actual artist behind part of that composition); when hearing your favorite bungle songs, does it invoke any consistent feelings with regard to the inability to be part of, progress, and enjoy new forms of that ensemble of sound? Or is the "good riddance" that overpowering?
This is really only meant to be one question, just hard to get at.

MY ANSWER:
I think I know what you are getting at; When I look back at those song writing days I see a bunch of smart-alec, irreverent kids in a garage band. Our first record really reflects that more than the others. Many of those songs were written together; pieced together in our rehearsal space or bedrooms. And I think of the 15 years that band was together as educational and experimental. I look back and think, 'I would never attempt that again' or 'what was I thinking?' or "now I know how to achieve that". But I don't have any regrets. I learned a lot. The art of compromising became less refined with each record. In other words, as we got better at writing and listening, as individuals, we started to veer towards separate ideas.

I've said this before, but we never had a plan. We never really had a vision. Our motto was "aim to confuse" but we never talked about "direction" or what we were attempting to accomplish musically even though we shared a lot of ideas about what made music good and fun. I definitely feel that we could have accomplished a lot more and that we wasted a lot of potential creativity. At the same time there is some of that good riddance sentiment. It took me a long time to learn how to accomplish my own visions; how to lead others when that was called for; how do read and deal with other people in the band and how to know and accept when something worked or didn't work. I think all of this is part of maturing in general. I know I --and I think we-- could do it better now. But "now" doesn't come without history. And once you've broken up with a girl it's just way too weird to go back, even if you still find her attractive. So, when I think about my contributions, I think "naive" and "youthful" to a certain extent. My musical ideas for that band were not my favorite in our repertoire, but I guess it's been about eight years since I even thought about writing for that group. You could say I've grown up and moved on, and what that has to do with your question I have no idea.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: yo
Comments: alot of my mates and i have been dabbling in alot of jazz, and jamming with jazz progressions and stuff like that! there is alot to learn from the style and stuff! The problem is my mates like all jazz, because its jazz. i like some of it because with all music theres good shit and down right corny shit! But alot of my mates like all of it because its technical! how do you convince someone just because its hard to play doesn't make it good? because if thats the case we should all just listen to dream theater!

MY ANSWER:
I feel your pain. And unfortunately I don't know how it's possible or if it's worth trying to convince others. Obviously there is a lot of shitty music out there. The sad part is: the people playing it think it's good. Of course "good" is relative and subjective. But I think you'd agree that there is a lot of music that is played with horrible technique, that's out of tune and "incorrect" and yet, it's good.
Good luck convincing your mates but I think that is only something that can be realized on one's own. Though good technique is something to be appreciated I think it's not reason enough on it's own to make good music. My advice to you is to find new mates.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Daniel Warren
Comments: Do you have any recommendations for an electric upright? I want to get a normal upright but I live on the fifth floor of a walk-up and I have no car, so an electric would seem better. Are there any you know of that sound/feel close to the real thing?

MY ANSWER:
I've never played one; never really had a reason or desire so I am absolutely no help here. sorry.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Matthew
Comments: Dear Mr.Dunn
I'm here to ask a question... I'm a senior in high school - I, matthew would like to move west and pursue my musical ( yes, i play just about everything) dream - My parents and girlfriend want me to head towards college .... please help

MY ANSWER:
well, Matthew, you're not giving me a whole lot to work with. I'd love to say 'pursue your dreams relentlessly' but I also think college could be a good idea depending on what you're after. What about going to a university or conservatory on the west coast whilst playing in bands and freelancing? Do it all, man. That's basically what I did. I didn't intend to graduate from college but I didn't know what else to do and in the meantime I learned a lot from playing in clubs with different bands. There's no reason your musical dream and school can't be linked. If one starts to take over in a positive way then go in that direction. At your age I think it's all about creating options and seeing all the possibilities before you. Good luck.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Rob Summers
Comments: Would you share the experience you had returning to the gear site in San Francisco you talked about? Were there other X-band members there to discuss the level of band
deadness? Also - I see you are being joined by a vocalist for your incredible Electric Masada group on NYE... is he gonna actually practice for this show?

MY ANSWER:
No, I was the only one there. Getting rid of crap that no one else wanted but was left to collect dust in a rented space. Stupid really. It wasn't a particularly pleasant experience except that I did find a couple of gems and they're mine all mine! I can tell you that it was a real fine feeling to sweep that storage space clean and walk away from it.

There was no rehearsal for that gig. Couple of short hits at soundcheck.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Kyle
Comments: So, a question for you:
You write an excellent column for a bass magazine which I can't buy as often as I would like. Would you ever consider releasing a collection of your columns as a book?
Also, do you find it irritating that in this modern age, there is a huge gap between musical excellence and innoavation and commercial success? (Now would be a good time to say you live like some sort of Greek God because of the vast sums of cash you make through music. And you live on a diet of cocaine and sawdust eaten of Geishas...)

MY ANSWER:
thanks for reading my column. I have thought about putting them all together in one place and maybe extrapolating on them and turning it into a technique book of sorts. That, however, is probably not going to happen in the near future. It's all I can do to find the time to write that article every couple of months!

I don't really think too often about that gap you speak of. I mean, believe it or not, I really think that there is excellence and innovation in many pop records. Take "In The Zone" for instance. I couldn't make a record like that. I wouldn't know where too start. Sure, it takes lots of money, high tech gear and amazing studios. But along with other goals I dream of being able to accomplish something like that.

I guess the aspect that irritates me the most is seeing amazing individuals who deserve a lot more credit and a better quality of life than they have. But I also see musicians who are doing well for themselves. Face it, the money comes from your audience. The bigger audience you reach, the more money you make. And why an audience would like you is really unpredictable and fickle.

I've never done coke.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Ste
Comments: Me and my wife met you the last 11/28 at the "Casa da Feijoada" in Rio, the day after Fantomas played the "Claro que Rock" festival. I just talked (in italian) to Mike for a few minutes and took some photos. In view of the fact that you are travelling all around the world for a lot of years now, are you still excited about your trips, or it has just become a boredom?

MY ANSWER:
It's never boring. I refuse to get bored. However, it's all I can do to keep from being jaded. Maybe that's the same thing. Maybe not. I certainly still have a deep appreciation for the fact that I play music for a living. I wouldn't give that up for a second. Also, there are lots of places I've never been to or haven't spent enough time in. Like Brazil for instance. Sure, I can say I've been to Brazil now. But in reality I spent a whopping three days there. Didn't see or do shit. Anyone who has ever read a travel book about Rio has seen more than I have.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: justin
Comments: hey trevor.
i know you have said this before on your page but i don't want to read every message as it takes my time. what was the pedal that you use to lower your bass without detuning? all right keep up the good work. sorry about the cat........

MY ANSWER:
So, because of your time constraints I have to repeat myself? Is that what you're saying? Well, I don't have such a pedal. I use a distortion setting that is also an octaver. Other than that, it's all in the wrist.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Denis/Brazilian who'll kill Alex Porres
Comments: 1) Hey, I saw you complaining about Alex Porres. I bought one of your CD from him, any luck with your portuguese mob connections? I might be able to track him down for you. I paid good money for the CD. the equivalent to 15 dollars. I might know of someone who might know about him... he moved from Rio a while ago, but if he is in Brasil I can find him, let me kill him for you and I'll mail one of his kidneys to you...

2) I was in the Fantomas concert here in Rio, it was amazing. How did you like Brasil? What did you get to know from the brazilian music and culture (apart that you cannot trust much of us)? For Example, (about another message you wrote here in this site regarding Brasil), What's the deal of hanging out with Chico Buarque and Tom Zé? I can undertsand you might have heard of Tom Zé, he's known worldwide and is a bit psichodelic, but Chico is an old man who's writting literature now, very weird man!!! Do you like him?

3) Hope to see you in Brasil soon again. What are the chances (and the cash) of bringing your Trio to Brasil?

MY ANSWER:
Hey, I wasn't complaining. But if you need to kill him be my guest. Just remember: it's against the law. Or is it? Maybe not in Brazil. I've recently retired from the black market kidney scene so no back alley organs for me, thanks.

so what's wrong with psychedelic old men who write literature? yes, I like Tom Ze.

It's unlikely the Trio will ever be in Brazil.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Richyvertigo
Comments: Hey Trevor... Have you heard Oasis' new single "Let there be love"?And if so, are you gonna be taking legal action...?

MY ANSWER:
I think I did hear that. Perhaps I should look into suing those little snots. I could use the bread, and they obviously could use the action.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Louis, the Brazilian
Comments: hey trevor!! saw fantomas saturday... awesome! made me stop feeling sad that bungle is dead... you guys were playing like you were possessed! I'd like to know if there is going to be more fantomas in the future, and what would you think the next album would be like... anyway, don't stop with fantomas because you fucking rule! and comeback
to brazil, there will be more caipirinhas and hot chicks waiting (yeah)...

MY ANSWER:
yes, I'm sure there will be another Fantomas record. Probably in '07 or '08. And I honestly have NO idea what it will sound like. Really, I don't know.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Chris theCrazy Canuk
Comments: Eh Trevor, still listening to your amazing music non-stop, eh. Just wondering if you have ever seen David Lynch's "Eraserhead"? If so, has Fantomas ever pondered to weigh in mind with thoroughness and care about covering the creepy "radiator song" performed by Peter Ivers? I realize Fantomas is Patton's band but I think its perfect for you guys. If you haven't seen this movie I recommend it with great velocity :). Also a couple questions concerning produce.
1.) Which vegatable would you rather sit beside on a city bus?
a. Carrot
b. Cucumber
c. Tomatoe
2.) Have you ever mistaken your toothbrush for a jalapeno?
3.) Do you ever encounter arguments with your green beans?

MY ANSWER:
yes, I think it was the first time I ever spent the night with a girl. We stayed at my friends house but he wasn't home. We rented Eraserhead. Oh, yeah now there is a flic to get you in the mood. Needless to say, I was a virgin for a long time. The first "date" I ever went on I took a girl to see The Wall. Brilliant. Didn't have sex with her either.

Hmmmm, do you really think people need to hear Fantomas making more noise? Ok, here are the answers to your stupid fucking questions: 1)cucumber 2)no 3)no


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: L. Boltzmann
Comments: 1. 1. T. Dunn have you ever read Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymous Bosch? I believe the trio convulsant's recording of "single petal of a rose" is like those oranges. If you haven't read the book, please lie and pretend that you have read it anyway. thanks.
2. was the music in "consuming capitalism" written with the ideas presented in the film in mind, like art vs. capitalism, mcdonaldization, etc? if not, then what the hell where you thinking?

MY ANSWER:
1) yes, I read it and the next sentence is a lie. this sentence is the truth. 2) no, I don't really try to "literalize" film music so much. To me, it's more about complimenting or enhancing the underlying feeling of the image, which isn't easy when there is no dialogue.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Anonymous
Comments: You and Mike have been playing in bands together since you were teenagers. When you're on stage with him now, do you ever get flashbacks to when you guys were young? Like...does it feel strange that you have basically grown up on stage together?

MY ANSWER:
I don't think it's any stranger than having thanksgiving dinner with your family every night for two months. No, it's not that strange. But it is familial and comfortable. ....The more I ponder your question the stranger it all seems so I think I'll stop pondering it....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Bruce Cook
Comments: hey, im from Canada its cold here. I have a question that you may never get around to answering, but im gunna try anyways...
ok, how do you write something thats 54 mins long!? like, do you just write small parts and then make transitions for them? or think of how each part will influance the next... i cant even wrap my mind around it. ive tried to write things of this lenght and it never turns out properly.. or as i imagined it.. help?
PS, do you like Ska? i LOVE Ska... Ska and Fantomas...

MY ANSWER:
I've never attempted to write something that long but if I did I would map it out first. I would draw it up with little symbols and words on one page with a time chart. I would have re-occuring themes and a specific form in mind. I would write in smaller sections and piece them together but not necessarily in the order in which they were written. Overall I would continually take a step back and look at the larger picture so that I didn't loose touch with my original map. That's how I would do it.

I used to like ska. Don't really listen to it anymore. Too many upbeats.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Re-signing to drop a question, Im an Aussie and Im curious, why the platypus? (picture) I work with them and theyre short tempered little bastards! They bite and smell really bad, cute though. Weird q. but am interested why...

MY ANSWER:
Typical. You fucking WORK with, HANDLE , SMELL and TOUCH the greatest living creature in the history of time and you don't appreciate it!! Blows my mind. Wanna trade jobs??


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: What happened to theo

MY ANSWER:
Don't know.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: brian o'blivion
Comments: hey trevor dunn, what are your top 3 cronenberg films?

MY ANSWER:
Well, I've missed his latest two, so without those to think about I would say, Scanners, Naked Lunch and Dead Ringers.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Charles
Comments: 1) Do you live in the U.S?
2) You look like an intellectual guy and i wanted to know if , first, u know Noam Chomski (writter), and if your opinion on American policies is similar to his.

MY ANSWER:
1) yes 2) I don't know him personally but I have read some of his books. I would say that I agree with some of his policies.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Charles
Comments: I have this question : Is it true that you can make "perfect" chords by doing i-dont-know-what with the gold number ?(if you know what it is and what im talking about)

MY ANSWER:
dude, you are high. I have no idea what a "perfect chord" is. But you might be talking about the golden mean which is a mathematical formula that some composers, and architects have used to design forms. I think Bartok may have utilized it.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Alex B.
Comments: Bungle is dead. Please realize that...I'm happy...
So sad that you are happy,most of us Mr Bungle fans are not.Before I say what I want to say,let me tell you that I deeply respect you (as well as the rest of the people that made the greatest band ever) as a musician..I can not understand why anyone of you guys from MrB. are unable to realize that MrBungle was a band loved by more people that you can even imagine,and that you will receive questions about MrBungle years from now and the questions will never stop..Why you haven`t put not a single recording with MrBungle to your selected discography,while you put the complete Fantomas discography (which for my opinion is not even closely as great as the Bungle stuff)?
I am really sorry I will not see the show in Zagreb this Friday,but I wish you all the best.
MR BUNGLE 4EVER

MY ANSWER:
Thanks for your love and support. I do intend on putting the Bungle CDs here on my discography. When I first started my own website people only knew who I was from my involvement with that one band so I wanted to create my own separate entity. I think I have done that now over the past ten years so I'm comfortable with adding Bungle to my list. Believe me, I am not ashamed of MR B. It was a major part of my life. I truly appreciate the sentiments and the disappointment from people who loved that band, but they will never truly understand the inner workings and why I feel the way I do now. They don't see the whole history and weight that exists behind the music. Not that what was behind was always negative. But there are definitely reasons for me to be happy with where I'm at and where I'm going.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
Comments: Have you ever considered setting up some kind of a forum so us bass geeks can chat to each other? It'd be like a little "Dunn community"

MY ANSWER:
I've never considered it. I just assumed that it would end up being a forum for racism and hate.....hey, maybe I should set one up!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: I'm So Clever
Comments: Do you often wonder how long the career death sentence created by an album made in 1991 will last? Do you cringe when slovenly kids in Bungle T-Shirts walk up to you to chit chat after the gigs you and Shell play? Probably. I wonder why you can't grasp that people still hope for a Bungle reunion. Weren't you ever a fan of a band?

MY ANSWER:
Of course I was/am a fan of tons of bands! Christ. I remember writing Blondie a letter once because I was disappointed with their AutoAmerican LP. I must have been about 12 at the time. I never sent the letter. I think I realized that a band has a right to makes its own decisions.
I don't usually cringe when people want to talk about Bungle. I'm happy to talk about it. You have to realize that I was 17 when that band started. I'm over twice that age now and a lot of other things have entered my life in the meantime. A lot of other things have become important to me. I wonder why you can't grasp that people who where in Bungle have better things to do now.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: I want to learn
Comments: Hi Trevor, Perhaps you can help me. I've always wanted to learn how to compose music rather than simply play it. I would like to learn more about counterpoint and somebody said that 'The Study of Counterpoint'(a translation of JJ Fux's Gradus Ad Parnassum) is a good book to start from . . . Could you please suggest some other books or even methods with which to learn?

MY ANSWER:
My theory about learning composition is to go straight to the source. Check out scores of your favorite pieces and analyze them. Reduce everything to a piano score (bass and treble clef only) to see it all in it's simplest form. There are a million counterpoint books out there. Schoernberg has a few. I never really studied traditional counterpoint so my knowledge of the literature is limited.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: hey man, Im a huge fan of your work, thanks for being and inspiration. first, I recently discovered circuit bent toys and keyboards, and theremins on ebay. Are circuit bent toys what we are hearing on Suspended Animation, as I noticed Mike had some dolls on his side when you guys came through town. What are your opinions on theremins and circuit
bent creations, are they very applicable in musical context. When I saw Fantomas for the Delerium tour Dave had these crazy chime things that he would hit with a mallet and then rub a bow across the top to create a weird effect. What are those things? Was the bowing an intended technique for them, or a product of improvising and finding that it sounded cool ? What do you think of The Mars Volta ? Finally, How long does it take to record a Fantomas album and how much of what we hear happens in post production? Great site, rock on !

MY ANSWER:
Thanks for the kind words. Firstly, yes, those are circuit bent toys on S.A. Secondly I love the theremin and there is a ton of great music written for them, including some great film scores like Rosza's Spellbound. I don't really think those two instruments have much in common. Circuit bent toys are more about the twisted technology. They are noise makers. The beauty is in the design. The Theremin is a unique 20th century instrument that is very difficult to master. Check out Clara Rockmore. I think both are useful in music. In fact, I think ANYTHING is useful in music. Whether it's good or not depends on a lot of things.

Those cymbals Dave was using are called rotobells, I believe...or roto-cymbals...something like that. Percussionists have been bowing on cymbals for quite awhile but I think the rotobells are particularly responsive because they are suspended and inflexible.

I've never listened to the Mars Volta. Believe it or not.

Basic tracks (bass and drums recorded live) on a Fantomas record takes about 5-7 days. After that I'm outta there! The rest is overdubs. Sometimes I'll spend a day just adding bass overdubs---coloring the parts that are already there. So I would say most of it is post-production. I'm willing to say that 100% of it is post-produciton.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: james joyce
Comments: do you like the pogues? i find your music somewhat adolescent. this may explain why you have so many jackass fans asking asinine questions.

MY ANSWER:
Nothing wrong with adolescence. What's so special about your question? Oh wait, I see. You know who James Joyce is. You must be totally grown up. Forgive me. Pogues suck.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
there's something thats been troubling me - how do you transport that HUGE harp around? Does it dismantle or does it fit in a van whole?

MY ANSWER:
It fits nicely in a small SUV. You can even get an upright bass in there with it! The harp doesn't dismantle. Stick around after a show and we'll show you.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
Comments: Hey Trevor. On Amazon it says that Debutantes and Centipedes is by "Trevor Cdagro Buz76003 Dunn". Whats up with that? Seeya.

MY ANSWER:
I think that's the catalogue number they threw in there. Or perhaps it's my middle name.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: how much do you practice everyday, and what's your routine?

MY ANSWER:
On a good day, with no distractions I try to put in a good 6 to 8 hours. But usually I'm too busy for that. I just want to be so financially secure that all I have to do is practice and write music. Don't see that happening anytime soon. AAAANYway...... my most recent routine includes a 30 minute long-tone warm up. 60 minutes of intonation/shifting exercises. An hour in Zimmerman's Contemporary Concepts of Bowing Technique. An hour on arpeggios, and hour on speed/hand co-ordination, and then 1 to 2 hours on actual music--either orchestral excerpts, a Bach cello suite or something of that nature.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: I'm So Clever
Comments: Do you think most of the idiocy you encounter in life would not have existed in the first place if you hadn't released that first Bungle album? I do.

MY ANSWER:
Yes, I am personally responsible for idiots.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Stef
Comments: Hi Dunn, ive got a bit of a problem ive been in a band for a wile, we started out playing long jammie prog rock/noise and it was starting to make me feel sick, so i started working on some home demos so far ive writen about 6 tunes, the problem is that my band seem to be finding it very hard to learn them, and when they find somthing hard thay cant be botherd to work on it and just want to move on to somthing else which i find very frustrating! have you ever had this problem? what do u think i should do? also i was wondering what EQ settings would you recomend for low/mid/high for funky bass like early bungle

MY ANSWER:
There is nothing worse than a lazy musician. Someone who doesn't have to work at McDonalds yet can't be bothered to sweat a little and put some EFFORT into their vocation. They're called pot-heads. I think you should bludgeon them with a large prybar, then find someone who shares your work ethic. Maybe they just don't like your music but are to lame to tell you. But I can almost guarantee that SOMEONE out there will share your sentiments.
I've always been a fan of fairly flat EQ for bass. I tend to put everything at 12 o'clock then roll back the highs and boost the low end a bit.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Leif Nicklas
Comments: Trevor, I was wondering if you've ever played an electric upright you've liked, and how do you deal with flying with an upright?

MY ANSWER:
Never used an electric upright. Flying with my upright is almost always a pain in the ass. Most airlines charge random, excessive overage. JetBlue has been quite nice to me, however. I have a large David Gage fiberglass trunk and I check my bass in cargo, which never feels good. I wink at the check-in staff and make them think I'm a novice, broke, on the verge of tears, or totally insane. (I am, in fact, all of these). Sometimes they charge me a little, sometimes way too much. Apparently there is a musician's union letter regarding the FAA and how musicians should NOT be charged overage.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: john downes
Comments: hello sir dunn,sorry to sound like an infidel but i learned squeeze me macca with fingers but i suspect its pop and slap is this the case? and whats your next project thank you snookums

MY ANSWER:
I seem to remember that the verse is all thumb (no poping). I think the only popping section is that go-go bell part of the song. My next project is gonna be huge! Start the hype now!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: aaron j. marko
Comments: dear mr. dunn, this morning, whilst perusing your website after work, i couldn't help but notice the many queries relating to mr. bungle, specifically those pertaining to the almost mythic mr. bungle reunion, which, at this time, is almost a virtual impossibility to happen. while i, being a rational human being, understand that mr. bungle will most definitely be not getting back together, i have to wonder what all of these other bungle fans are thinking. yes, it's really sad that one of history's most notorious and, (arguably), influential avant-garde bands will not be producing any more records, you'd think that by now, after, quite literally, YEARS of other projects, and the former members themselves denying the possibility, that they would learn, but alas, no, and here they are, filling your guestbook up with entry after entry of pathos, taking valuable bandwidth that could be better utilised for "slippery" photos.
at any rate, here are my questions:
1) what is your official stance on the veitnam war? according to allen ginsberg, they were wrong. do you concur?
2) have you ever made effects pedals? i'm fairly poor, and i was just wondering if this may be a more economical way to go.
3) if you were going to make dinner for anyone at all, what would it be and who would you serve it to?
4) what has been your worst/weirdest celebrity encounter?
5) what are your five most influential/favourite records of all time?
6) bandannas: fashion faux pas?
7) do you have any sort of spiritual beliefs? are you religious to any degree?
8) what was the last great book you read?

MY ANSWER:
1)I concure with anything a gay, drug addict-poet says 2)I've never done it but I think it's quite possible and you should give it a try. 3)I would make collard greens with rice and cajun shrimp topped with dill for Sandra Bullock. 4)I saw Fabio once. 5)Messiaen's Turangalilia Symphony conducted by Ozawa, Erik Sanko's Past Imperfect..., Highway To Hell, Jaco's 1st solo record, Mingus' Ah Um. 6)I only wear them when I'm sheetrocking. 7)yes, and not really 8)Immortality by Kundera


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Juvenal Magallanes
Comments: trevor who do you think is the best bass player of all time, I would have to you are my favorite bass player

MY ANSWER:
You are too kind. But, yes, I'm a fusion geek at heart and I would still say Jaco.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Shlomo
Comments: Hey Trevor, I was wondering what type of upright bass do you play? Also what strings you use on them? What kind of pick up do you use? What amp do you use
with it? What are your favorite pages in Simandl (book 1)? I really appreciate your bass playing and strive to be as competent musician as yourself. By the way, I asked Carol Kaye if she was your mom and she told me she aborted a baby boy that she was had named Trevor in the middle of her 3rd trimester. Be well.

MY ANSWER:
My upright is Czeck. That's all I know about it. I use Tomastik SuperFlexible. I have an Underwood pickup. I use an Acoustic Image Focus 1 amp with a SWR 4x10. I like all of those intervalic exercises: 3rds, 4ths, 5ths, etc.... Carol Kaye played on Pet Sounds. I was conceived at that session. I'm an acid baby.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Brian
Comments: I just accepted a job for writing a score for a short film. I have composed before, but never for film. I know you wrote music for a film, and I also know that you have worked with Zorn and his filmworks. I was wondering if there are any tips you could share with me. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very much and keep up the good work.

MY ANSWER:
Don't let the film maker make musical decisions. Concentrate on making a great record. Read the book Undertones and Overtones by Royal S. Brown. Listen to Bernard Herrmann and Jerry Goldsmith.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Mike
Comments: Howdy Trevor, I was wondering what you think of the band Mastodon.

MY ANSWER:
Not my cup of tea.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: aaron
Comments: Trevor, I've heard rumors of a new Idiot flesh album i thought that you you would have something to say. Do you know if William Winant will be involved? What band do prefer Sleepytime or Idiot flesh?

MY ANSWER:
I believe they have a record on Mimicry. I don't know if there is a new once since that or who's on it. I think I prefer SGM.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Ian
Comments: Hi Mr. Dunn, or Trevor I'm not sure what to call you but I am in a bit of a dilemma. My guitarist friend and I are the co-founders of our band and we’ve been together for 5 years but now I have a feeling that his heart isn’t in the music anymore. He used to be incredibly enthusiastic about his art, the most out of all of us, but now all he seems to do is smoke weed all day, he hardly practices anymore, he’s lazy during practice and his playing has gotten much worse. He’s having problems with his mother and father as well. I wanna be there for him as a friend but as a musician I just can’t take this anymore. I feel that our band has a lot of potential, were all dedicated to our music except for our guitarist who doesn’t seem to give a damn anymore! What should I do?

MY ANSWER:
Well, I'm no social worker but maybe you just need to have a heart to heart with the guy. He's obviously in pain and denial regarding his family. Weed is always a good cure for that. If you are there for him as a friend I think the music thing will work itself out.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Dude
Comments: Is it true that you are norwegian Trevor? I've heard stuff about it, plaese explain.

MY ANSWER:
I am, apparently, according to geneologists in my family, 1/4 Norwegian. Long live black metal.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: ben
Comments: trev why can't i find an original (or atleast older) version of i'm sick? where did you hear it?

MY ANSWER:
Here's a little secret. The real name of the song is Salty Sadie. It's from the sound track Two For the Sea Saw. For a long time I thought it was called I'm Sick (which is the next song) because of the way the titles are listed on the sleeve. I decided I couldn't have the title Salty Sadie on my record so I ignored my mistake. Don't tell anyone.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: john doe
Comments: Do you have any grindcore favorites? A fan of pain killer? Happy Trails

MY ANSWER:
It's all metal to me, baby. But that stuff hasn't been in my CD player for a while.....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Tuffy McFuckelbee
Comments: Trevor; I'm really enjoying my vinyl copy of Delirium Cordia, It has a much warmer feel to it than the cd. My question is did you guys (Fantomas) record the record digitally or analog? And do you think if a record is recorded digitally and then pressed to vinyl it will still retain that "warmth" of sound as much as going from say a two inch Ampex reel to vinyl?

MY ANSWER:
I believe the whole record was recorded digitally but I can't be certain. I'm not sure about the whole vinyl warmth thing although I have experienced it myself with some recordings. Classical music, especially 20th century chamber stuff is so much clearer on CD. Tape is expensive and bulky so I doubt I'll ever use it again. And vinyl is geared to a very particular audience. I never buy anything new on vinyl. So to answer your question...I don't know.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Michael Turi
Comments: Howdy, I was interested in reading some more of your columns from the bass playing magazine. I'm not sure how many columns you've done total, but might there be a way they could be collected all at once? Or else I guess I'm just stuck buying a bunch of back issues?  Thanks for your time and notes.

MY ANSWER:
I honestly don't know. You might be able to get them on line, or request them from the magazine. I've done probably ten or so by now.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: steve
Comments: heya, Trevor
just wondering what your thoughts are on bootlegging?. i saw fantomas on your last tour, Could't help but tape it, turned out okay, cept for ramblin drunk chicks throughout the recording,
Do you guys record all your sets? Maybe on your next fremantle visit - > i could ahoy you for a line out..

MY ANSWER:
I don't give a rat's ass about live bootlegs. I've done it myself and I'd surely share those recordings with other people. I have Ween at the Kennel Club, SF 1992. Wanna buy it?
And you want to ahoy the what with the what now??


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Matthew
Comments: Hi Trevor love the work. Just a couple of quick questions.
1.Did you join Join Fantomas because Patton's an old friend who writes quality music that is challenging but fun to play or was it more of a "Patton sells and I need to pay the rent" type of deal
2.I saw Jools Holland and Tom Jones on the t.v. the other night and I wondered what you would say if they called you up looking for a bass player.
3.When are Fantomas going to play in Tasmania. Moneys not everything you should do it for the fans.
Keep up the good work.

MY ANSWER:
1) I joined because I thought the first demo he gave me was brilliant and I wanted to be a part of it. 2)I'd take the gig if it payed crap-loads, and was a short stint 3)I'd love to go there. I have nothing to do with the booking decisions. Why the fuck would you say "money's not everything" to me? Why don't you quit your job and hang out in the park in Berkeley? Money's not everything.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Luke
Comments: Hey Trevor, what's your favourite Van Halen album. What do you think of their bass player?
Would you play on one of my future albums? (it's got a Beck/NIN feel)

MY ANSWER:
Hands down, no question: Women and Children First. I think Michael Anthony is a great bass player. Send me your music and we'll talk......


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Dex
Comments: Hi Trevor; quick question. I'm always told when recording bass that it's always better to record direct as opposed to miking the bass cab. Do you subscribe to this theory or does it depend on what type of music your recording? Any specifics would be appreciated because the only bass players I know personally depend on me and my "expertise" of
recording. Anyhow, keep a rokkin!

MY ANSWER:
I recommend doing both always. Although I've been in situations where I recorded only direct, others only mic-ed. It DOES depend on the music and studio and engineer though. A direct sound is much cleaner. In rock situations I always prefer a mostly mic-ed cab sound with a little DI behind it for support. It's always best to have multiple options when you are mixing. You can always cut or ride one.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: meep
i was wondering if you were ever planning to do a tour of australia? i know fantomas just came through, but i couldn't go because it was at an 18+ bar. i cried.....i cried for the first time since i saw the movie Edward Scissorhands....

MY ANSWER:
I would love to but I probably can't afford it. Maybe someday.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Scott
Comments: Mister Trevor,
I videotaped your performance with Shelley Burgon at the Ratward in Hampton last year. Did I already mail you a copy? I know I meant to but I honestly do not remember if I did.
Also, what did your most recent meal consist of? When you take your meals, do you take care to include representatives from all the food groups? (Be advised that the Food Pyramid was rewritten in the wake of the low-carb revolution so beef, pork, and chicken have their own separate food groups now) (venison falls into the beef group, and fish is a grain)

MY ANSWER:
Yes, I have a copy on video tape. I just ate two quesadillas. One with avocado and one without. I'm very conscious of getting my fruits and vegetables. Always trying to eat greens. Don't eat much red meat but lots of fish. Thanks for the Food Pyramid info, I was wondering when they were gonna update that thing.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Justin
Comments: 1) Sorry to hear about your cat
2) I notice in one of your news updates you said you went to Sardinia, is this a good alternative to actually going to the main country of Italy or Sicily? Who turned you onto it?
3)Would you ever seriously consider joining the Melvins permanently?
4) Finally when a band like Fantomas or Bungle tours(ed) Europe or elsewhere abroad how do you handle the shipping of all your big amps/drum sets and shit? Can you just take it all on the plane as checked cargo or does it go separately and is it expensive?

MY ANSWER:
1)thanks :'( 2)You stay away from Sardinia. That's my island. 3)Probably not. They're in LA and have their own set of plans. Although I will be doing the Houdini set with them from time to time 4)We rent amps and drum sets when we travel abroad, which, of course, adds to our expenses. We bring the personal necessities--pedals, percussion, etc.-- and hope that the amps we get work.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Ok i have 2 questions... Kinda. 1) I am 19 years old and have been playing bass for about 6 years. I am a HUGE fan of your work (firt thing i Heard was your trio work then i got into bungle... unlike most others it is opposite) I was looking through your Q&A and i noticed a few Questions about...d are i say... "Dead Bass Goon". I was looking at the scans and i didnt really Understand them. im a wee bit illiterate when it comes to music talk. I understand all the finger placings but what is #5? am i to use my thumb on it? im lost. Plus i am more
interested in the, what i like to describe it as, the carnical sounding line. The first bass line that comes in. i would like to see a Tab of those both if at all possible "i have read how much you hate it but im just another desperate fan) can you hook me up? im pretty sure you will say no.
2) i forgot...

MY ANSWER:
The TAB example I put up isn't exactly correct. I didn't really understand TAB until recently, and now I loathe it. I don't recall there being anything that says #5 though. The numbers I've written on the fretboard are the order of notes in the line. Yeah, I know, it doesn't make a ton of sense. I need to re-do that and put up an example of actual TAB.

I don't think I'll bother with notating the "carnical" line but it's pretty simple. It's sort of two parts at once. The "bass" part is G, C, F, Bb (I think those are the right notes, if not, you can transpose it to the correct frets). The "upbeat" line is four descending chromatic tritones F/B, E/Bb, Eb/A, D/Ab. It's really just a III-VI-II-V progression and you can play it in two positions (starting on the 15th and 13th frets on the E string). Sorry for the lingo. Ok, maybe it sounds harder than it is, but you just have to position the chords with your left hand like a guitar player.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Aurélien
Comments: Hi Man,
1. What do you think of Rocco Prestia ? And of Sean Malone ?
2. Do you know Renaud Garcia Fons
3. What are your minds about Fender Jazz Bass price and Fender basses totalitarism over basses world (OK, qui te difficult to translate this sentence !) ?
3. Did you find the "moules" fine ?

MY ANSWER:
Hey Aurelien! 1)I think Rocco is amazing. Who can argue with that kind of finger style. Either you like Tower of Power or you don't. Malone I don't know...who is he? 2)I have a couple Fons CDs. His technique is mind blowing but the music tends to be overwhelmingly cheesy. I can only listen to it for short periods of time and just for technical humiliation. 3)I think it's kind of ridiculous but hey, that's inflation. 4) Moules are always fine.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Polonia
Comments: Hey Trevor, I was wondering if you have any songwriting tips for me. I've played guitar/bass for years and I come up with ok parts, but can't combine anything into songs. To say the least, it's frustrating. I realize not everyone has songwriting talent, but at least I'd like to be able to put together a crappy song - it's a start. Is there any theory books or anything else I should study? Anything would help.
Thanks!

MY ANSWER:
I think good song-writing is an underestimated difficulty. In other words, I'm still trying to figure it out. It takes something special to really compose something that really works and takes you to a different place. I'll spend the rest of my life trying to work that out. My only tip for you is to try everything. And make an outline of what you want a song to do. Just sketch out some abstract drawing or text and think about the song as a whole before you get bogged down in details and riffs. Keeping your building blocks simple helps, too. You can always theme-and-variation your cells into complicore if you need to. I'm sure there are books on structuring songs but --I'll just say the same thing I always say-- you should just study what you consider a few good songs. How are they constructed? What are their forms? What are their harmonic progression? Then take those elements and apply them to your own material.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Andy Green
Comments: I saw that you're writing "songs" these days. I also read that with Fantomas maybe taking a break next year, you have an idea for a new band - is the goal to use the songs that you're working on right now with that band? It's all incredible news, I really hope that you're able to release the stuff you're working on - based on your past work, it has to be amazing. Thanks!

MY ANSWER:
yeah, I'm still in the embryonic stages of writing songs for a band to play. Thanks for your compliment. We'll see what happens.....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Me
Comments: Maybe you've answered this before, but if you haven't, or you just feel like answering again: I often get stuck on an idea, or a melody, or a technique. It's not really a rut, I feel, but sometimes I come back to the same expression just to set it in a different frame. Or to see if it matches a certain context better then a previous one. Does this ever happen to you, or do you deliberatly side-step old ideas in search of fresh new meat? Keep rockin', you've been a major influence musically. I appreciate it.

MY ANSWER:
Some say that you really only write one song in your entire career and you just keep varying it. You could say that about Ornette Coleman for example. Or even David Bowie. I guess thats what style is. I think I have a few themes I come back to, whether I'm improvising or writing, and yet I feel oblivious to whether or not I have my own style. Part of me says "if it aint broke don't fix it". And changing contexts like you say makes sense to me, too. But I also try to grow and not repeat myself too much. First and foremost I need to keep things interesting for myself.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Gaseous Vertebrate
Comments: I thought I would take this opportunity to ask a serious question since you are gracious enough to answer all questions. Mr Bungle has started to receive the recognition it deserves for it's musical prowess. However, after reviewing the Mr. Bungle performance in Gurneville, California in 1989, I have concluded that the dancing abilities that the band exhibited are quite remarkable. Do you feel that you have received the credit you deserve for your innovative approach to intepretive dance?

MY ANSWER:
No, I don't. And I think I even embarrassed my band mates. I wasn't much for the traditional rock stage presence back in those days so making a bigger ass out of myself than I already was led me to a fancy jig. Of course, now I'm to "cool" to dance at all, plus I'm old and my knees hurt. My dancing days are over.....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: drummer
Comments: Hey Trevor, you might have already gotten this question, but here goes anyhow. Was there any video of the Fantomas tour with Bozzio, and are there any plans for a DVD in the works?

MY ANSWER:
Someone told me they saw some video, but nothing official. No DVD plans.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Andrew
Comments: Hi Trevor, couple of Q's:
1. When you're on tour, be it whoever with, do you try & catch some of the support acts? Do you enjoy them? Or if it's a DJ like at Fantomas in Sydney, do you listen or enjoy what is played?
2. any advice on pick techniques? I now have to play with a pic for 50% of the songs in the band I'm in, and have always been a finger player. Any tips on how to hold it, exercises etc..? (I'm obviously doing those UP/DOWN 1-4 permutations with the right hand, but would like to hear what you do, as you so seamlessly switch from Fantomas to Trio Convulsant...)

MY ANSWER:
1)I do try to catch them, but in general, it's hard for me to listen to a bunch of music right before I go on stage. If the band is really amazing, like Zu or Melt Banana, for example, I may end up checking them out night after night, but even then I have to leave the side of the stage before they finish and just space out in the dressing room for a good 20 minutes.
2)Switching between upright and electric is not easy, and kinda not fun for me. I don't do anything special in terms of pick technique. I do hold the pick backwards. That is, I use the broad end on the string.
Sting crossing exercises, like octaves, are good for pick control.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jamie
Comments: Hey Trevor... I have 2 questions.
1. How do you deal with cockroaches?
2. When was the last time you painted your toenails?

MY ANSWER:
1) I get those glue traps, spray lysol everywhere and clean up after meals. 2)It's been a while. Probably the summer of 1996. Ruby red, baby.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: hansen
Comments: What's happenin-
Trevor, what are your feelings about the Chapman stick? Would/have you ever play(ed) one?

MY ANSWER:
I tried one in a music store years ago and became annoyed and confused. It's seems like something amazing could be played on that, right? So why so much noodley crap? Clusters, man, clusters!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Davide
Comments: I'm a bass player too and i own a fender jazz and a Cort TM Stevens Signature (pure Funk!!). I'd like to know what's the brand or the model of that five string bass that you used for almost every Mr. Bungle concert (I've seen it in the videos of 24000 mila baci in 1995 and Mr. Bungle concert where you were masked) ...It has an amazing sound! I'd like to know even if Trevor Dunn Trio Convulsant or Electric Masada will ever come to Italy. Thank you very much and greetings to Mike!

MY ANSWER:
It's an Alembic Europa. I was a big fan of Stanley Clarke back in the day and always dreamed of owning an Alembic. My trio was in Venice in November '05. E-Masada gets there from time to time. I'll tell Mike you said hello.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: MIke
Comments: I saw you with the Trio and Fantomas in Detroit...both kicked ass. I was just wondering two things:
1.Does your P-bass play as nice as it looks?
2.I know you use the same bass with Electric Masada, is it hard to put normal gauge strings on it with the adjustments you made to it for Fantomas, or am I just thinking too hard about it?  Good luck in the future.

MY ANSWER:
Before I answer your question I have been asked to relay greetings to you from Davide, the guy from the previous question.

1)it plays quite nicely. I like it. 2)No, it's quite easy. It doesn't seem to slip around in the nut at all.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: miguel
Comments: hello trevor. you're a fucking stud. I love you.

In some of the answers to these questions, it seems obvious that the singer of fantomas sometimes pisses you off. what's the deal. are you homeboys who occasionally have static? or are a the hired bass player who hates his boss? do think the two of you will ever be in a band where it's more of a collaboration? I think that would be neat, because you're both fucking radical.

I am a guitar player, but the bass player ofmy band completely adores your playing and your music, and I was wondering how one goes about getting a bass lesson out of you?

also, what do you think about Tools music/justin chancellor's bass playing? any chance of you touring with them again? or perhaps you, starting a band with danny carey, patton, carla kilstedht (from sleepytime), omar rodriguez lopez, and johnny greenwood?

yeah so. that would be really neat. you should really do that. it would be huge.

MY ANSWER:
Everyone pisses me off, but I certainly don't hate my boss. Actually, I'm my own boss. But I think anyone who has played in bands with the same guy for over 20 years is allowed some static once in a while. I don't see us really collaborating anytime soon, but I wouldn't rule it out. I think we are both well on our ways to doing our own things.

As I've said before, the best way to get a lesson from me is to approach me at a gig and exchange numbers.

Not a huge fan of Tool. A bit too prog for me I guess. Though I think all those guys are really good musicians. My latest column in Bass Guitar Player is about Justin.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Mick Carew
Comments: Sain Bain uu (Hello),
Firstly, no I am not Mongolian, I just work here (geologist), but hopefully it grabs your attention. Unfortunately, I'm someone who loves music but has no actual musical
ability whatsoever (or at least doesn't have the patience to pursue it) , so no technical questions from me. In any case, since you have visited Oz numerous times in the last few
years, have there been any bands from my home country that have grabbed your attention? And what do you think of Nick Cave, both as the Birthday Party and Bad Seeds?
Bayarla (thanks), Bayarta (and goodbye)

MY ANSWER:
Love Birthday Party. Haven't given the Bad Seeds enough of a chance. Love Acca Dacca. I've been to Bon Scott's grave.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: bill
Comments: hi. not to add to the pile of off-topic (i.e., not Dunn-oriented questions) but i've noticed a bit of contempt on the subject of a certain member of a couple of bands you play in.
that stated, i was wondering if you think it's inevitable that these kinds of tailor-made bands eventually will deteriorate pre-established friendships by sort of demeaning them into business relationships? do tensions on the bandstand carry over onto the tour bus, or vice versa?

i was in a control-freak band situation for a long time, and kept with it because i really believed in the music, despite what it was doing to a previously close friendship. does it really have to be that way? is the trade-off worth it?

what of the opposite... i've also been in a too-many-cooks-in-the-kitchen kinda scenario where there were always a slew of great ideas, some feasible some not, but as a consequence nothing stayed solid and, far too often, nothing would really get done. did Bungle suffer from this?

MY ANSWER:
hmmm...contempt is a pretty strong word and I'm not sure what I said to warrant these kinds of questions, but let's just say that tension on and off the bus is inevitable especially when you're dealing with the same people on multiple tours for years and years. It's like any family really. But the older I get the better I learn how to deal with dysfuntion. I don't know if I could be in a band with someone I felt actual contempt for. And sometimes the best way to deal with dysfunction is to remove yourself from the environment even if that means sacrificing the income.

I think money and business are often the nemesis of friendship and music and the only thing I can say is that you have to remember why you started playing music in the first place. You have to choose your battles and choose your trade-offs I suppose. I mean wouldn't it be nice if we could all make crap-loads of money playing music we believe in with our friends?! Why does that question make me laugh out loud? It's sad that it makes me laugh. I think it's still a good goal to have and I can't say that I don't actually do that. But you know, I'm friends with musicians I don't play with and I play with musicians who aren't really my friends....and everything in between.

What you said about Mr Bungle was spot on. Yes. We suffered from the too-many-cooks-who-is-the-band-leader?-corrupt-communism-vagueness thing. Possibly a problem with sort of growing up in a band together.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Theo
Comments: Hey, what's Theo doing nowadays? Why did you guys kick him out? Did he really play all the keyboards on the self-titled? Theo put the funk in funk metal!

MY ANSWER:
We unanimously decided to go on without him because he wasn't growing with the rest of the band and we were running out of things for him to do. He got pissed off and I haven't heard from him since. He didn't play any keyboards on the first record. I think he solely played alto saximaphone.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: bOnG42o
Comments: Questions from an Igloo:
Hi again Trevor! Thanks so much for taking the time to answer my questions about your show @ Seattle's Showbox. I must say it was a huge coincidence that you fellas played the very song I was asking for as an encore. My questions are:
1) Whats yer favorite Pastorius composition?
2) Do you listen to much classical music and if so, what?
3) Do you jive Dream Theater, Claypool, and/or Nuclear Rabbit?
By the way, I was asking for you guys to play "Fire walk with me" in between your songs. While you performed with Fantomas and your Convulsant, I was an observant mute in awe. Not once did I yell out another band, just so ya know. I dig your thick sarcasm though, its like peanut butter on the roof of my mouth, got milk? P.S. Thanks for the encore anyways, your a true inspiration.

MY ANSWER:
1)There are a lot of good ones but I'd have to say Portrait of Tracy because it is STILL flawless. 2)All kinds. I have a fairly extensive collection of 20th century stuff but lately I've been digging Ravel, Sibelius' 2nd Symphony, Schnittke String Quartets, and Segovia. 3)Jive?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Tatann
Comments:
1) Are you (or another member of Fantômas) friend with Charlie Benante ? Cause I'm 99% sure he arrived on stage during Fantômas' sound check and stayed behind you and Mike during the whole show (Anthrax were playing the same night)
2) I also sadly discovered during this festival that Kevin Rutmanis was no longer playing with The Melvins. Were you asked by Buzz to play with them ? If he hasn't asked yet, would you accept the offer ?
3) What do you think of Danny Lilker's work with Brutal Truth, S.O.D. and especially Exit-13 since this one is more "jazz-oriented" ?

MY ANSWER:
1)We got to hang out with Anthrax backstage in France. I was surprised how cool Charlie and Ian were and how much they knew about avant-garde music. They are very aware of modern music which is refreshing. 2)My work with the Melvins may or may not be limited to occasional performances of the Houdini repetoire. 3)Haven't heard Exit-13 but I was the first guy in my high school to scrawl an SOD logo on his jacket. I think Lilker's playing is appropriate.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Nick Green
Comments: Hey Trevor, I've read a few times that you will occasionally listen to Britney Spears. Is there an album of hers that you would recommend?
P.S. - All of your fans are hoping she will invite you to play on her new album!

MY ANSWER:
Well, the only one I actually have is In the Zone, which I stand by. There is some great shit on there. The Tricky song, for instance. And what would any household be with out the My Prerogative DVD? I mean, I'm not into her for her singing!
Thanks for the good wishes. I still have hope.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
Comments: Is this KISS room yours?
http://www.kissmuseum.com/Museum/dunn.htm

MY ANSWER:
I was unable to find this page but whatever it was, it wasn't mine. It could be my brother's but I don't think so. There was a time in my youth, however, when he and I shared a room and the ceiling was covered in Kiss posters.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Chrs Hiscocks
Comments:I was wondering if you could tell me how you recorded the bass for the first bungle album. Did you use the Europa, and how was the q filter on the bass/pickup balance set? What technique did you use to the desk?

MY ANSWER:
The first Bungle album was recorded before I owned that bass. I had some kind of an Ibanez at that time. I forget the exact model. And I used a Peavey TKO combo amp! Can you believe it?! Peavey! If I remember correctly I probably had one channel for DI and one for the cabinet. On a couple songs Zorn had me add a subharmonic octaver type thing when we mixed. I think that bass sounded pretty good actually and I think part of it's punchiness came from going through such a small amp.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Justin Pull Paul Underwood Undies
Comments: do u use your fingers or do you use a pick a think fingering the bass usually sounds better. But i still get dung notes or shit sounding background bass i have no idea how to fuck with settings on my amp. Actually i Dont even fucking know what im talking about but something doesn't sound right i try turning down the volume and shit I think it comes down to rythme and drums and shit

MY ANSWER:
I use both my fingers and a pick. It just depends on the situation and the tone I'm going for. In terms of your settings I would start with everything in the middle. Add a little bass, take out a little treble and season to taste. A lot does come down to rhythm and drums. You are right about that. But if you're talking specifically about tone every little bit along the way helps. Don't worry, a little experimenting with different stings, settings, basses, technique, speakers and amps will eventually get you to your own personal sound.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Freakwatcher
Comments: Trevor, Love your recent articles in the Bass magazine about rhythmic perspectives. Trouble is, this mag is very hard to find in the UK, any chance you will publish them on your webpage, or make them available somehow? I am having a blast playing the exercises......

MY ANSWER:
Cool. Glad to hear they are useful. It very difficult to make a point and illustrate it in such a short column. Plus they end up getting edited so they never turn out EXACTLY how I would like, but close enough. I'm not sure what my rights are in terms of being able to publish them myself but I have no immediate plans to do so anyway. But I'll look into putting them up on my site. Maybe someday I'll compile them all and extrapolate the material into something larger. Until then, I'm not sure what to tell you. Subscribe to the magazine maybe? I think Barnes & Noble carry it in the States, if that helps. Thanks and good luck.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Sammy the onion head
Comments:
I have met you a bunch of times at Fantomas and Mr. B shows and you have always been cool to sign all my crap.
I have a question, will you ever release the Mr. B demos since you have the tapes? You mentiond a book (I hope this comes out) and maybe a cd of unreleased tunes. How many unreleased tunes are there? Did you guys record a lot more than what was released?
I know you recorded 3 more songs that were not on the first Mr. B record.
Last question, was Bowel of Chiley ever sold by you guys? I have never seen the official tape cover. Was that live shot of you guys on stage that's on the bootleg cd the tape cover?

MY ANSWER:
That book concept is FAR from being a reality. It's just a hazy thought in my mind at this point. Part of that haze includes demos, rehearsals, prank phone calls, unused photos, etc. The amount of unseen/unheard material I have collected over the years is somewhat baffling. Believe me, it's not going to happen anytime soon.

You should stop listening to the Bowel of Chiley demo. It's crap. It really is. It was never intended for commercial sale. That was our demo to send out to clubs in order to get gigs and such, so there never was a cover. Some asshole put a horrible live photo on it and started selling it. Maybe it was the Pope of Punk--a classic character from the Humboldt County HardCore days.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Effigy
Comments: Hi Trevor.
I was wondering how you and the other guys in Fantômas remember what to play during a gig. I've been listening to Fantômas since the beginning, and I still can't remember which page/date is which. Do you use the actual page/date titles on a setlist, or do you have other titles for the song to remember them more easily?

MY ANSWER:
Retention is the most difficult thing about that music. Somehow, after rehearsing and touring the shit out of that music, the brain has a way of making associations. During the last few tours we've only been playing a few tunes from the first record and my set list may include something like: 24-27. Those numbers don't necessarily make sense with what is on the record because the numbers represent the order in which they were written and that order was changed to make the sequence of the album more fluid. Anyway, when I see the number 25 on my set list my mind goes directly to that song as it would if it was called "Fiona Apple Reminds Me of a Girl I Had a Crush on in the 8th Grade, Yes?" Some of the tunes do have nicknames though. Like "Albatross" or "Date with the Bartender".

I have found, with most difficult music, memory is the same as it is with less difficult music. It's a matter of rote, repetition, muscle memory and hearing what comes next. The more you challenge yourself the easier it becomes. That said, I still screw stuff up.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: E.M.
Comments: Hi Trevor, "The more you know, the less you think you know." I love the saying and the concept. Well, no, the concept drives me fucking nuts, but I do quote it a lot and I was wondering if you came up with the exact phrase, so that I can give credit where credit is due.

MY ANSWER:
I was lucky enough to have a mom who took me to the public library which I have a fondness for to this day. One day, in the late 70s, in Eureka, I found a book about paradoxes. I think it was called Paradoxes, or something. There were a lot of anecdotes and one-liners in that book that really blew my head off and shaped my way of thinking. For instance, what happens when an irresistible force meets an immovable object? I should look for that book. The cover had a picture of a hammer thats handle turned into a board that had a nail in it. Whoaaaaaaa!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Johnny
Comments: I have some stellar Mr. Bungle bootlegs. How do I go about getting rights from the band and arranging royalties to release them (legit) on vinyl, cd or dvd?

MY ANSWER:
You don't. You'd have to contact us all individually or I'd have to deal with it....hmmm, ok, here's what you do: you send copies of all that shit to me at my PO Box and I'll decide if I want any of it released. Then I'll find someone to put it out and any royalties will be dealt with through that label. You have to understand that at the most, you would be credited with filming, but beyond that, financial compensation would be inappropriate.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jim Figurski
Comments: Hey Trevor,
1.) In what country is Fantomas most popular? I figured America, but I'm starting to wonder if it's Japan?
2.)I'm going to see you guys on Sept 8th 2005 in Osaka, Japan. I'm really looking forward to it. Can I meet you guys after the show?

MY ANSWER:
1)I don't know. My guess is the States. 2)Wow, that was almost a year ago and I'm just getting to your question now. Guess I should get a secretary. I ate blowfish in Osaka.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Mike
Comments: I have a few questions about a few Bungle songs:
1)What types of basses and amps did you use on the first album?
2)Did you write the Carry Stress in the Jaw intro, and if you did, how long did it take?
3)What do you think of Merry Go Bye Bye?

MY ANSWER:
1)see my response a few questions prior. I also used a Peavey(!)fretless bass on Dead Good and Carousel. 2)yes, I wrote the intro. I don't remember how long it took to write that specific part, but c'mon, it's only four bars. It's possibly based on some of the melodic material of the rest of the song, like the bass/vocal melody. Some of that was written by improvising over the guitar/sax line until I found something I liked. I probably spent a couple months, on and off, working out that song. 3)Merry Go Bye Bye is one of my favorite songs on DV. We recorded it in sections and then Trey took the sections home and put them together, so the rest of us had no idea what it was going to sound like.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Enrique Terrones
Comments: hi, honestly disregard my last question i have a real one this time.. so worth asking that i wouldnt mind if it was my last one answered. i was checking out the paths you/Mike Patton took and the path Trey S. took.. and anyone obviously can see the different tastes on both sides.. you and mike patton seem more alike and really push the minimalist approach, though still really technical.. trey and his web of mimicry really have a lot to take in, like an over abundant explanation.. and that kind of seems like his nature,reading some things on his
website.. i was wondering what your thoughts were on these approaches.. because what you guys are all doing seems so odd that you were ever able to make music in the first place! do you find beauty/meaning in both?

MY ANSWER:
I don't totally understand your question, mostly because I think Fantomas is far from minimalist. But maybe you're talking about liner-note type explanations and "artist intent" and manifesto. In that case I think Patton and I do have similarities that differ from Trey but Patton and I also have our differences. Let me put it this way: I don't think any of us ever had any idea, at least on California, what the other's lyrics were about, and still don't. That is part of the beauty, meaning and problem. We had enough shared affinities and hunger through high school and college that brought us together. We sparked each other's interest, fed off each other and, hopefully, inspired each other. As we got older and more focused those affinities branched away from each other, though I think they are still part of the same tree. I think you are one of the first people I've heard express that side of it with your question and I'm glad you noticed.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Le Flake
Comments: 1) Does'nt your girlfriend get pissed at you touring the country with babes like Mary and Shelly?
2) Is Mike Patton gay? He lives in the Castro so he must be gay, so...he is gay isn't he? I mean I'm not gay or anything, who said anything about me being gay, I'm not, I'm thinking about tits right now I swear to god.
3) You know Geddy Lee rips, put aside the Dungeons and Dragons lyrics and falsetto vocals. Your good dude, but he could rip you a new (b)asshole, that was clever was'nt it-don't steal my shit bro.

MY ANSWER:
1)My girlfriend gets pissed when I leave my socks lying around, or put records on top of other records, or change the channel while she's watching Jeopardy, or spend all day on the computer answering questions from people I don't know. 2) Who isn't gay? 3)First of all, dude, Neal writes all the lyrics. Secondly I don't recall a single Rush album (well, I only owned three) that talked about dungeons nor dragons. Tom Sawyer is how I learned to play in 7. By the way, when is the last time you listened to Rush?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Cait
Comments: Heya Trevor. Could you please answer these 2 quick questions?
1. What would you do if one day you had a freak accident (or something like that) and couldn't play bass anymore?
2. Yes or No : Do you have an account on the Bunglefever BBS ? Just wondering since it is listed in the 'referred by' section of this guestbook form.

MY ANSWER:
1)God Christ Almighty! I don't like to think about that shit. I think I'd just write music. 2)No.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: DA
Comments: Hey Trevor,
My first bass teacher I ever had totally changed my perspective of music introducing me to Mr.Bungle, Primus, Living Colour etc. and since then I've progressed into more avant garde music. I recently picked an Eric Dolphy album and have really enjoyed it. What are your thoughts of Dolphy and what other artists would you recommend from that era?

MY ANSWER:
Dolphy is amazing; totally unique. And I have mentioned other musicians from that era before, such as Charles Mingus, Herbie Nichols, Andrew Hill, Ornette Coleman, Celil Taylor....etc, etc.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Tom
Comments: Do you know the history of bass playing? ’Cause I do. Don’t talk about things you don’t understand. Like saying modern rock music "sucks." I’ve done the research; I've studied it. On another tangeant. I caught that Levi's jean commercial the other day. Brilliant. A perfect use for "Easy." Patton never sounded better.
Is there a product endorsement you'd allow one of your compositions to be used for? It's all about the money, man.

MY ANSWER:
Ok, yeah, I said "modern rock music sucks". I said that. You crack me up. On another tangent you're a dumbshit and I would gladly endorse the makers Wusthof knives and then I'd take the money and buy a Stiletto Titanium hammer to crack your skull.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Elessar
Comments: Hello Trevor. I don´t want to take to much of your time, however I do have 2 questions for you.
1.I have played bass for 2 years myself, and I use a Thunderbird bass. The first time I heard the sound of it I thought: "I´ve got to get me one of these!" I was just wondering, if you ever played one, what you think of the Thunderbird ?
And 2: What was it like when you first were signed on to a big record label with Mr.Bungle ?

MY ANSWER:
1)sorry, I've never played one. 2)At first we were excited. I ran went to Tower the day our CD came out and bought it myself. It was also the first CD I was ever on. Then, after a few years of a non-supportive, non-communicative and ever-changing staff, the novelty wore off.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: chris schurr
Comments: Hey Trevor, I wanted to ask you how hard was it adapting from elec bass to stand up bass. Was it a whole new thing or was it the same just upright. I would really dig playing upright and I found one for 1200 bucks thats in good shape but I've never played one and Its a big deal if I decide to get it. I play elec bass poorly by your standards. But I like the upright bottom end better than elec. Can you give me some feedback on making the switch and the pros and cons of each instrument.
Sorry ifd I'm a pest....later

MY ANSWER:
When I initially took on the upright I was not ready for the major differences. I came to realize that they are two totally different instruments. The upright has more in common with a cello and the electric is, obviously from the guitar family. I don't want to discourage you. On the contrary I think it's great to play both but, as far as I'm concerned, it's twice the work. But you can distribute your time on each instrument differently. In other words concentrate on one at a time.

The spacing on an upright is much larger in the lower register, and much smaller in the higher register, and as a result, proper left-had technique is more complicated. Intonation becomes an additional focus. Bowing technique is an entire world in and of itself. And that said, I say, go for it!


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Yo Trevor,
when a band breaks up, are you forced to take sides? i only ask because i didn't see you at trey's show at the stone, even ches was there! so, if bungle were to have dinner together, would you be the guy that would have to pass the salt since nobody else would talk to each other? you always seemed like the sane one.

MY ANSWER:
Let me put it this way: I was the guy who passed the salt while that band was together. As far as I was concerned there were never any "sides" to take, which was part of the frustration. The reason the band continued to not play/call each other has nothing to do with sides. It's much more complicated than that.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Rosco
Comments: Trevor, I'm a huge fan, but I'm particularly a fan of Retrovertigo. It's a brilliant song. Do you have more like it and would you ever release an album of songs in that style (not just the RV style, but also maybe stuff like carry stress in the jaw)? Thanks for making amazing music!
MY ANSWER:
thanks! I will probably never write a song like Stress again. A lot of the stuff I wrote in Bungle was somewhat conceptual which is a direction I find myself leaning towards less and less. In terms of Retro, however, yes, I'm still very much interested in "songs" and the song form; melody and lyric. I am, in fact, writing "songs" now. What I will do with them, I'm not sure.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: My band is in the middle of booking an October tour. Though we've played a few out-of-town gigs, it will be our first month long excursion. We are attempting to do everything ourselves, traveling from NYC as far South as Memphis. This could be a total disaster. And our music isn't exactly Mickey Mouse. Any advice you might have on the matter will be greatly appreciated.
I enjoy "Sister Phantom Owlfish" very much.

MY ANSWER:
Throw away your preconceptions about having your own space, eating where you want to eat, getting eight hours of sleep, sleeping in a nice bed, listening to music only when you want to, lying down when you want to, feeling healthy, being in a good mood all the time, having an empty bladder, sitting on a clean toilet, or living, in any way, like a human as opposed to an animal. Still want to tour? Good. Now just remember to drive safe and have fun.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Hobble
Comments: Hi Trevor. I have been playing bass for several years now, and a lot of your stuff with Mr. Bungle was a real inspiration. i was just wondering what kind of exercises you do to keep your left hand up to speed?

MY ANSWER:
I do the basic stuff: slow, chromatic permutations of
1-2-3-4 (there are 24 of them), the usual scales, arpeggios, etc. The key to speed is starting slow.
Practice with a metronome and once you feel completely comfortable at a slow tempo, move it up one notch at a time. But be wary of pain. Muscle pain is ok, but tendon pain is bad.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Desplanques Francis
Comments: Hi Trevor! I've seen the fantomas show at Le Bataclan (Paris) with Mr Bozzio. I play bass guitar in the band "PAF & SCORPENE HORRIBLE QUARTET".
We've given to you a DVD, in Paris, of our project, have you seen it?
What do you think about it? see you at your next show in France. Thank you for your talent and the good sound that you give us. We love you. Bye and see you soon. Francis aka ohreone

MY ANSWER:
I'll tell you, I receive many documents on tour, most of which I try to check out. Some get lost or broken.
I can never remember who gave me what. I have a pile of "demos" that I have yet to listen to. I don't think I have your DVD. But I might. As it turns out, most of the stuff I receive is terrible. I think that's kind of unfortunate. Also, it's very difficult for me to get back to people about their stuff.
Unless it totally blows my mind, I just don't have the energy. But I do give everything a chance, as long as it makes it home with me.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Matt Haycroft
Comments: on the 2003
Australian Geek Show Tour during the Sydney show's Melvins set you drank a whole bottle of vodka during 'going blind' and passed out on stage.
Were you ok the next day? the crowd loved it. i met you once too. you signed a US $1 bill for me. Fantomas one side, Melvins the other.

MY ANSWER:
For some reason, when I'm in the Southern Hemisphere, and especially after I have visited Bon Scott's grave, I am able to drink insane amounts of booze without getting sick, drunk or horny. I don't recommend you try this at home; it's poison. Hard liquor is bad for you, kids. Stay away.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: mr. cramps
Comments: hey man. how are you? just wondering really if you've checked out the british music scene lately? you probably had a few play at that sucky live 8 thing, snow patrol?kaiser chiefs? i dont know. how there composing and playing has no emotion. just wanted to say it pisses me off man does it you? cos i guess you've had it in america always. n i get slagged off as a bass pl ayer from everyone my age(17) cos i dont play like these guys. which dont really matter but i just thought id get it out here cos its obvious u know what music is to you and it seems to be the same for me n ur an inspiration dude. are there any musicians you could perhaps recommend cos there hard to find in a world surrounded by guys who treat their instrument as an extension of their fucking dicks not their soul. u dont even need to answer dude, just the moan helped! thank you p.s u prob get this alot but ever piss you guys(including mike) off that quite a few ppl at your shows with fantomas are only there to see mike and not to hear the music?

MY ANSWER:
yeah, man, rant! rant away! let it all out. it's good for you. I hear your frustrations and all I can say is that as long as you believe in what you do, you'll be happy. There will always be people who think you suck, or who you think suck. So why worry about it.

Yes, the cult of personality is strong and annoying.
it does piss me off. What can I do? Just keep doing what I do, I guess....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: John B
Comments: Hey Trev! I caught a Simpsons reference a while back in the Q & A (See my slippers? They're albino, african endangered rhino.), awesome.
Anyways, along the same lines, do you like listening to any humorous music?
I personally really dig on bands like Ween, good songwriting with a good sense of humor. Although I of course write and listen to serious music as well, I always have a lot of fun creating stuff that makes people laugh, while writing good music too. Any thoughts about the subject? Thanks a lot for the great music, and for listening!

MY ANSWER:
Hell yes. Humor in music is all good. Kagel, now there's a guy with a sense of humor. I don't think humor, when it's done well, is all that easy to accomplish. It's an art as much as making people cry to make them laugh. Zorn's Torture Garden is hilarious. Stockhausen's Intensitat....Ween's the Pod....good fun.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Name: A Girl who thinks you're gorgeous
Comments: Is Shelly Burgon you're girlfriend and if not can I send you shocking and revealing photographs of myself? I felt it was high time some "slippery" girls started participating in this website.

MY ANSWER:
My relationship with Shelley remains personal and private, known only to family and friends. In other words, none of your business. I prefer to draw some lines between my personal life and this career-oriented website. That said, bring on the slippery photos!!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Rui Tenreiro
Comments: Hello Trevor. I was curious. Do you have an all-time favorite film, or even favorites? Is Disco Volante inspired in any way by Fellini?

MY ANSWER:
I have a few all time favorite films. Off the top of my head they would be: Over the Edge, Altered States, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Lady in a Cage, Tommy, Glengarry Glen Ross, Sweet Smell of Success, Touch of Evil, Love is the Devil.....christ, I could go on for days.
I would say no to the Fellini influence. Although I suppose he could have slipped in there subliminally.
We were all coming from different places with that record, I think.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: valentin
Comments: hello
dou you know the french jazz man MARC DUCRET(he plays with bobby previte, tim berne and others)? Ithink there is a lot of similitude between your way to write music in trio convulsant so if you have the time let mlisten to him it's a genius of composition and guitar just like you bye

MY ANSWER:
Yes, I do know him. He's amazing. And, I have been a huge Tim Berne fan for many years. In fact, I was going to mention in the previous question, that some of the stuff I wrote for DV was inspired by him.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: paco
Comments: what do you think of frank zappas music

MY ANSWER:
I like some of it, but not all of it. I appreciate his musicianship, and I love his book (The Real Frank Zappa Book), but he was never a huge influence on me.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: j
Comments: Sometimes after spending a significant amount of time on a piece of music, I find it hard to be objective. In other words, by the time I finish a song I can’t tell if it is any good anymore… have a tendency at that point to think that it sucks and scrap it, I’m just sick of it regardless of other people’s opinions. Does that ever happen to you?
What’s your remedy? Also, when I have “improvised” compositions (laid out a structure but not specific notes or chord changes. Maybe just tonal centers, instrumentation and starting/stopping points) and am lucky enough to yield an idea that I think is worth developing, the refined version of it almost always lacks some intangible quality that the original improv possessed. Be it a loose feeling or some background noise that just cannot be reproduced. What have you or people you work with done in these situations?
Go with the polished version?
And last, what is your opinion of triggering samples LIVE? I have been a pretty die-hard Fantomas fan and seen you guys about 6-7 times live, including the very first show at Slims back in June of ’98. I have noticed that MP has taken to using more and more samples each time I’ve seen Fantomas. Really kind of spend about half of the show waiting for you guys to play, I think he has even taken to triggering some stuff now that in the past was at least attempted live. Same with TS on the California tour, playing around all those samples must not leave a lot of room for error or spontaneity, what’s the point of trying to reproduce a song live that just can’t be? Don’t you think it would be better to fall on your face while going for something new and in the moment rather than triggering that sample of something that was new and in the moment back in the studio 10 months ago?
Looking forward to your opinions.

MY ANSWER:
1)That absolutely happens to me. One remedy is stepping away from it. Once you think you've finished it, or even before, put it away and work on something else. Clear your head for a few days, a month, whatever. Then come back as a listener. Working on several things at once can have it's benefits too.
Ultimately I just try to finish stuff, i.e. get it out of my system, and then move on to the next thing.
Hopefully knowing what you like and dislike in your own music will make itself more immediate with experience.
2) I don't usually refine improv or semi-improvised pieces. I may record several takes and choose the best one, but I would do that with any music. There certainly are examples of music that seems so right I just had to accept a few extraneous noises, or imperfections.
3)I have to agree with you 100%. It's not really my thing. And that was one of my least favorite aspects of Mr B. Call me old fashioned but I'd rather arrange things to be played live as opposed to compressing some lofty orchestration. Or, just get the god damn orchestra out there! And having to play the same song the same way every night of a five week tour can start to feel like typing.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Adam M.
Comments:
1. What music do you listen? can you give me group's name, what you still listen and you like?
2. Do you ever come to Poland witch Trevor Dunn's Trio, or Secreet Chiefs 3?
3. Do you have wife...?
4. How many years you had, when you start playning on bass?
5. Do you took music lesson, to play on bass?
6. Do you like Poland, and Polish Fans?
7. Do you have good money, from playning on bass with not commercial groups?
like fantomas, your trevor dunn's trio? or maybe you play only for small money, and satisfaction, becaus you like play this music?
8. What drugs do you like? or maybe you don't take drugs.... or maybe you still take? i think drugs are cool ok, that's all.
My english is very bad... , so, try guess sometime what i mean and remember, you are the best

MY ANSWER:
Ok, you've got EIGHT questions here, my friend.
Expect some shit.
1)The more you know the less you think you know.
2)SC3: no. Trio-C: maybe
3)none of your damn business
4)I was 13 when I started
5)yes, I took many.
6)I like Polish vodka
7)I make a living playing the music I like to play for the most part.
8)yeah, I take them all!! Uppers, downers, reds, greens, boobies, napalm, dink, sponge, XTC-STP, vomit, assjuice, piroshkis...all at the same time. helps me think.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Ivanov
Comments: Greetings, Trevor!
First of all, the show in Moscow was great!!! Thanks and come back again!
And the question - what bass players influenced you the most? Guess every bassist has favourite players while learning to play.
Or maybe which bass players did you like the most. Your manner of playing is unusual and beautiful (I mean not only Fantomas hehehe but Mr. Bungle too).

MY ANSWER:
I listened to the usual guys when I was first learning: Stanley Clarke, Jaco, Larry Graham, Ray Brown, Scott LaFaro. LaFaro had a particular influence on me which I think is still kinda evident in my playing. Thanks for your kind words.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Questions from an Igloo: I saw you perform with Fantomas @ Seattle's Showbox, simply amazing! Do you remember a crazy canadian screaming for Twin Peak's "Fire Walk With Me" at this specific show, cause it was me. You blew my F%#&ing MIND! I could not belive the very first time I saw Fantomas, you nut bars took my request. Thanks for changing my life forever as a musician. Who's idea was it to play "Fire Wal With Me"? Your a legend that is leaving a historical crater in musical history, keep rocking!

MY ANSWER:
Thanks for your compliments. I don't remember that particular crazy canadian, but believe me, there are lots of 'em. Just so you know, we weren't taking requests. By chance, you yelled out the song we were about to play. My favorite thing in the world is people yelling out songs while I'm playing another song. Or even better: yelling out other bands. It never fails. Whatever band I'm on stage with someone is yelling out some OTHER band I'm in. Is that a compliment, or just yelling?

Fantomas is Patton's band. He decides.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Charity
Comments: Do only boys visit this website? All the Q&A's are from boys!
I'm not advanced enough on the bass to ask you anything relivant just hoping that one day my girly fingers will allow me to play something/anything of yours.

MY ANSWER:
I'm not sure of the sex of anyone who visits this site. I do know that mostly boys attend a lot of the shows I play and I'm not sure why. I think that sucks, not only because I like girls, but because I think they add something to society that is unique to my perspective. Why don't more girls come to Fantomas shows? I don't know. Sure, it's boy-ish, testosterone-laden music but...so! I listen to girly music. Well, not that wimpy singer hippy lesbian shit, but you know...M.I.A. rules. So does Betsy Jolas, Carol Kaye, Mary Lou Williams, Annie Godfield.....they're chicks aren't they??

I hope neither you, nor I, are using the word "girly"
in a derogatory fashion because just because you are a girl doesn't mean you can't shred on my or anyone else's ass.
Thanks for visiting my site!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
Comments: Hey Big D.
Does your cat have mitten fingers or it's claws uni-colored? Tell Mikey P he needs to do a duet with King Diamond! That would be essential! P.S. In the video to "Everything's Ruined" Mike Patton makes several gestures imitative of other singers. Please provide the names of all these singers! You will win a prize.!

MY ANSWER:
Who is Mikey? Ok, I don't know what "Everything's Ruined" is but here's my list: Flea, Les Claypool, Eartha Kitt, Kent Brockman, Luigi Nono, Norman Mailer.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: pete w
Comments: Hi - will any of the live Masada Book Two from Tonic be gettting released? The Electric Masada set was easily the most incredible music I've ever witnessed and your duo stuff was superb too - bug Zorn to put it out, please!

MY ANSWER:
I'm sure he will put it out in one form or another. I know that the Masada quartet has been touring with those tunes, and I believe that Electric Masada is going to record some stuff by year's end. By the way, for you're information I don't really have much influence on anyone in terms of bugging them to do stuff. Cheers.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: john
Comments: hello, ive read on the internet MR.BUNGLE will finally have a new album, yessss!! heyy, people, theres a new bungle album coming out thats so fuckin great! trever was just fucking with us, the fucker! wow!!! i also read somewhere you are gay? is true? how did that happen? but you have to know i really dont mind, cuz its not so evident on your records, so..
aaanyway, thanks for everything, man! yes!!!

MY ANSWER:
John, you are a fool.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: kokot
Comments: hi! there! thanks. i am sorry for my english language is not so good as you, but i have a question i need to ask to you? yes? would you answer my question?

MY ANSWER:
yes. yes I will answer your question.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Hello Mr. Dunn,
I died the other day, and when I did I realised that I didn't really exist after all. What will you do when you realise you can't stop, and then again, when you can't stop your ghosts... do you hope to be dead before they overtake you... is that a way of gaining entry into the book of 'Worthwile Life'?
P.S. Checkout TheMightyPsychonaut at mp3.com.au DO IT!

MY ANSWER:
I'm living, bitch.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: john donson
Comments: dear mr dunn,
i am a massive fan of your work and have a really technical bass guitar question for you...noooo...arrrrggghh...cant hold..it....any...longer...MRBUNGLE....there, i said it, cover's blown, yes, i'm another mr bungle fan who cant let go, like a stupid dumped boyfriend punching a wall, refusing to believe it's over, or a family with a missing child, unable to grieve until the body is found.
I am a grown man, im 32 this year, i have a steady job, a fiancee, great friends, house, interests, sudoku. why do i scour the internet once a month looking for a single line in a crappy interview which might even just hint at mr bungle recording again? this is gay. i need to stop doing this. wheres the body? i need to move on.
you could do it in court, the whole band, official like, documents signed in triplicate. i love all three bungle albums, a lot.
i feel they have played a big part in where i am at today (on my own in front of a PC on a friday night), i really do think you are/were (?) a great example of a band being far greater than the sum of all its parts, no showboaters, just everyone playing (excellently) whats required to make an amazing song.
california is a classic.
retrovertigo is one of the best songs ever written (always brings a tear to my eye), as is merry go bye bye, followed closely by live and let die, wings eh? the band the beatles could have been!
i realise by now i have already abused this guestbook thing and your team of personal assistants probably deleted this mail after running it through the bungle filter, however, if not, i really like trio convulsant, i love fantomas, particularly delerium cordia, which almost made me forget my bungle issues!
i saw you play with john zorn (music)at the barbican too, which was a nice surprise.
shit man, im starting to feel a bit weird about this, like im talking to myself?
before i go, do you like any british comedies, brass eye, the day today, alan partridge? just wondered.
i'd always hoped mr bungle would write a musical, somewhere beween the rocky horror show and jesus christ superstar...rocky christ horrorstar? go on, i know you're tempted!
sorry,
thanks,
bye,
captainluton,
PS i know ive fucked up, please dont diss me on the internerd, i feel stupid, theres my punishment!

MY ANSWER:
John, my dear. Yes, you fucked up. Now go give yourself a spanking. And then look into the mirror and say "Do you see or hear or do I smash the mirror"....no wait, don't say that... say, "Mr Bungle will never make another record; all the members live in different cities worldwide and are partaking in their own lines of interest. They don't really agree on things enough to make it happen anyway, that's why they are so busy in their individual endeavors. They were always too big for their britches. Not enough money or label support or member commitment to achieve their highest dreams. So be it. Life goes on. An old man dies, a young girl lives". Say it! Say it!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Bob
Comments: Cute cat. What's his name?

MY ANSWER:
Her name is Kedi.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Dion
Comments: Trevor, years back I sent Danny a bunch of Zodiac Killer stickers I made, he said you put one on your car. I figured you probably have a different car by now so I wanted to know if you needed another one. I know you said only one question but one last quick one, ever heard Creedle?

MY ANSWER:
I don't think I ever had that sticker, but I don't think I want one anyway. I don't know what Zodiak Killer is. What if it's a KKK support group?
Or some pro-life bullshit. You never know these days.
I also think it's stupid to have political bumper stickers. What does it do? State your alliance? I mean, I see a car with some political rant on it's bumper and you know, it doesn't really make me want to change my ways or think on some deeper level. Its a CAR! Its a STICKER!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: mowi
Comments: Now that I think about it, i've got a Q.
How's your real life like? Do you like bunnies? I mean, to fuck them.

MY ANSWER:
You are stupid and nasty all at the same time.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: enrike
Comments: its presentation in mexico was huge, are you going to return?

MY ANSWER:
un dia, vamos volver.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: feknbok
Comments: Hi Trevor, just wondering about 'The Holy Filament' - probably my favourite track on California, but other people I've talked to don't seem to like it as much. It's obviously quite different, was there any doubt about it being a Mr. Bungle track? Have you written anything else like it?
Are there any particular musical influences that you can mention for that track?

MY ANSWER:
Thanks! I originally wrote the melody and chord progression during the writing of Disco Volante but never came up with a solid idea. I discovered it in my notes years later when I was trying to write some song forms. I liked the idea of a "long" melody. The bridge I wrote much later. For some reason I think the Ry Cooder soundtrack to Paris Texas was an influence. I can't remember why. I had also acquired a Fender Rhodes right before the California writing sessions which influenced a lot of what I was coming up with. I don't think I've ever written anything else in that style. And I can't remember if that song was ever on the "chopping block". I don't think it was.

Incidentally, I read once, on the Caca Volante site, some misinformation about the lyrics of that song.
They were in fact directly influenced by a single paragraph in Louis Aragon's Paris Peasant.

Also, I wrote the main melody which is a bit obscured by the harmonies that Patton came up with.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: shannon
Comments: Hey tevor. I am a former guitarist that bought a second hand bass 6months ago and never look back! i have resently bought a 300watt hartke quod box.....i don't know much about brand names and quality of bass head units and just thought you could point me in the right direction?!?!
And 2) Do you think its morally right the pimp your body on the street to save up money for the gear?

MY ANSWER:
Honestly I don't know much about brand names either, I just listen for something that I think sounds good.
I'm sure your Hartke is fine. Do you like it? If not, check out some other amps. Ampeg, SWR, GK, Acoustic Image---those are some names I like.

As far as your second question I sort of have a hard time with people selling their bodies while their mind subsequently rots. Sex is an easy way out, especially for women who become objectified and rewarded for the power they have over men. Ultimately, are you really going to enjoy being fucked by a bunch of fat, looser, scumbags? Probably not. As a result you will probably turn to drugs to ease the mental anguish. In the meantime, your chops will go to hell and you'll have to hawk the gear for crack anyway. So forget it.
Stick to the bass!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Ignoranus
Comments: Hi Trevor. What's it like playing with Terry Bozzio?

MY ANSWER:
A blast.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: the guy that ate the pie
Comments: Hey Trevor . . .
About "sister phantom owl fish"; I would really like to know what kind of chords those "songs" (I hate that word) are based on.
Or at least what chords you were thinking of when playing/improvizing.
Hope that makes sense. Thank you.

MY ANSWER:
Well, I don't hate the word "song"...I mean..."tune"
maybe..."piece"...I don't know. I don't think any of them are based on chord progressions. It's really more about counterpoint: The melodic line and the bass line. I'm sure you could figure out some crazy atonal chords which happen as a result of the horizontal writing, but I don't really think about it that way. I mean, I am thinking about chords leading to other chords but not in the traditional jazz sense of "chord progression"

Most of the improvising is totally free, i.e. whatever happens, happens and it's different every time.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Marviac
Comments: Hi Mr. Dunn,
okay....no Chance for Mr.Bungle....no Questions about Musicians which are more famous......hmmmm....When does Fantomas do such Thing as the "Viva
2 Rock Squad Special " again on German TV ????? It was the best I have ever seen.....promise!

MY ANSWER:
I didn't feel that you really wanted to ask that question. But that's ok. Do you have a copy of it?
I've never seen it. Send one to my PO Box. I'll reward you with a sticker I found.
YOUR QUESTION:
Name: The Idiot
Location: san jose
Comments: hi trevor, just killed a roach with some w-40 and thought of your music... maybe you have some insight regarding the level of ignorance in the critical community as to the work Zorn puts out. i just saw him in Berkeley with the Masada trio and those new compositions are pretty tremendous. like many bungle fans i was turned on to him, unlike many bungle fans ive grown to realize hes an important living composer whose sound is exciting, brutal, playful, erotic, haunting, penetrating, honest, completely conscious and very generous to his players. and he's still growing...why is he not respected by academia or any of the more 'sophisticated' circles around. do other musicians you know think hes doing something real special or is he just considered as a character who re-hashes language? Whats the Deal? by the way i saw your trio on the last fantomas tour, and i thought your playing and the pieces themselves were very impressive, suprisingly
subtle.. keep it up.. take care...

MY ANSWER:
Thanks!
Ultimately I think it's a matter of his being self-taught. A lot of "darlings" of the classical world are respected because of where they studied and what degrees they hold. In fact, many self-taught musicians are barely regarded at all in a serious way. Zorn is far more "post-modern" than most composers could ever hope to be, partly because he respects and is involved in punk, jazz and film music. Those are three styles often scoffed at in the world of people who did all their counter point exercises and played Beethoven's Sonata #17 at their senior recital.

Now, I'm not gonna sit here and completely bash the academic world. School was a good catalyst for my own self teachings. But that world can also be incredible closed-minded.

I think most musicians in his "circle" respect him and would agree with you. But then again, a lot of us would probably be treated the same way.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Ryan
Comments: Trevor - So heres the deal - I've been playing bass for 7 years now, and I think I've really wasted my time. In that period, I've put a lot of effort into playing the showboat Vic Wooten crap, instead of trying to be a true musician (a true Bassplayer, more specifically). Soon I'll be going to college to major in music, and I where I can play serious music on double bass, my electric
playing seems to be just wanking. I was wondering what you think I should study to turn myself into a proficient electric bass player/artist? I love playing bass, and I dig your style, so your opinion is very much appreciated.

MY ANSWER:
When I first went to college I was very ignorant. I thought I was going to study electric bass a la Berklee School of Music, but when I walked in the door they handed me and upright and a bow and Simandl's two volume book. For the next four years I studied classical technique diligently, barely touching my electric. And I have since gone through several phases where I focus on one over the other. I also realized that practicing one, even though the technique is totally different, helps the other.

Well, that doesn't really address your question so let me do that now: I think you should study what you want to be able to play. If that means getting back to basics and playing along to Sly Stone records or playing in a groove band where you do nothing but ostinatos all night, then so be it. What is your definition of being a true bass player? If you come up with a list in order to answer that question, then you have to ask yourself what you need to do to achieve each thing.

When it comes to technique and ability, I always prescribe the standard, tried and true basics. The usual scales, the usual exercises. What you do with those fundamentals, how you bend them, and how you break the rules is only limited by your own creativity and ideas. One step is having control of your instrument. Another is translating what's in your head into audible sound.

By the way, I'm still writing an article in Guitar World's Bass Guitar Magazine which are essentially lessons that talk about the technique of the music I play and the kinds of things I've studied.
Good luck!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: lee
Comments: You've probably been asked this a number of times but I am an
ignoramus. what do you think to Les Claypool's playing?

MY ANSWER:
yeah, I'm kinda tired of answering that question. Why is it even a question? Why doesn't anyone ask me what I think of Bobby Vega or Rocco Prestia? Does Les still play? Is Primus still a band? Who cares? I don't listen to that stuff anyway. The last time I heard him play was probably 1992. Why doesn't anyone ask me what I think of pineapple, or Liz Phair? Why doesn't anyone ask me what I think of Homies or the price of Fender Jazz basses made in the 60s, or Britney Spears or MC5 or copper or how I deal with cockroaches or when was the last time I painted my toenails? Huh? Why doesn't anyone ask me that stuff?

Well, I guess I shouldn't be such a jerk because years ago I asked Les for advice on amplification and he is, in fact, the one who turned me onto SWR. Peace.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: rob
Comments: Hey trev just had a few bass questions. I recently started using the mutron envelope filter and I'm noticing a loss in volume when the effect is engaged. I know that you used one in the past and just wondering how you combated that problem. Also just wondering if you have met or what you think of Lee Sklar, Melvin Gibbs, and Andrew Weiss? PEACE!!

MY ANSWER:
I have the same problem using pedals, especially a volume pedal. Honestly I haven't figured it out yet. I usually just compensate by turning up the amp. Does the same thing happen if you plug a guitar into it? It might need a trip to the shop. Also, consider looking into some sort of pre-amp that will boost the instrument before it gets to the pedal.

I've never met any of those guys but I love Gibbs playing. That band with Frisell and Ronald Shannon Jackson is great. Sklar has a beautiful concept of simplicity but I don't have many records that he's on. I'm not too familiar with Weiss. I'm not a big fan of the Ween band stuff. But who can argue with the Butthole Surfers?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Christopher James Bish
Comments: Hey man, what where your views on FNM? I know they where kinda sucky in the late 80's but didn't it get better as it went along? Also, is Patton a bit of a control freak? Does he ever annoy you by telling you or other members of Fantomas what to do all the time?

MY ANSWER:
1)I was never a big fan. I thought the most interesting thing about them was what Patton added, but it's also hard for me to listen to that stuff objectively. I hear the guys voice so much that its not something I want to put on at home. I'm sure I never would have heard a note if it weren't for him being in the band. Actually I kinda like that record with Chuck singing.
2)yes.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Fuzzy McSlash
Comments: Hey Trevor,
I was eating a McDonalds cheeseburger a few days ago and thinking of the impending Fantomas tour, and I was just wondering - Does fast food taste really different in other countries? Ie - Does Americas McDonalds and KFC taste totally different over here in Australia?
- Cait

MY ANSWER:
I stopped eating fast food while I was in high school. I used to go to Burger King for lunch all the time. Then I started to feel ill afterwards and I haven't touched the shit since. I think it's horse crap and I think monoculture sucks. However, I must admit that I love In N Out Burgers in California. Technically it's fast food but it's actually food.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: sam
Comments: Have you heard the new Meshuggah? Also, Jason Brown (ex Hank Willaims) says hi.

MY ANSWER:
yes, I just got "I" as well as the new one. I like it. It's weird.
Please pass on a "hello" to Jason for me. Cheers.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: mr coffee
Comments: Hello there, it cant be true our summer festival will host Fantomas!Loads of fans are coming!Well,the correct name of the location is "Parco di St. Agostino"  - noticed a mistake in the gigs page. My question is: do you prefer to be honoured with a bottle of italian wine or weed after the concert? all the best!

MY ANSWER:
Well, I guess you didn't show up cuz it took me so long to answer this question. My answer would have been "both" but as it stands, I'm eating Amaranth cereal and drinking passion fruit juice.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: hey trevor. i saw trio convulsant at the hemlock in SF last year, and i thought it fucking ruled. saw you guys again at the fillmore this year, and i thought the large room really killed the vibe of the music. couldn't feel the performance at all. i came to the conclusion that a 3-piece playing (mostly) acoustic instruments and dynamic arrangements is probably best experienced in a small room. then i realized this concept limits your ability to make $$ and i felt guilty. what are your thoughts on the matter? is trio convulsant music (consciously or unconsciously) composed for a small room? p. nus

MY ANSWER:
I completely agree. I think that band makes a lot more sense in a small room. I almost didn't do those tours (w/Fantomas and the Melvins) precisely for that reason. But I couldn't really say no to that kind of exposure. If I had it my way the trio would play small jazz clubs.

I definitely don't consider room size when I'm writing but, yes, in general the trio, with acoustic bass would be ideal in a room that didn't swallow it up.

In terms of the money, a larger crowd doesn't necessarily affect the opening band--it gets a guarantee. So don't feel too guilty.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: frank del gato
Comments: can i pee in your butt?

MY ANSWER:
You are disgusting. Totally gross, dude. How about I bust your head open and then dump medical waste into your gapping wound? cool?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Lloyd
Comments: Trevor,
Have you ever been involved in the Faxed Head Crew? Who is who in the band?

MY ANSWER:
I've never been involved. I'm probably not at liberty to disclose any information that would subsequently cause certain associates to feel betrayed or ostracized in anyway therefore I will refrain from providing you with the necessary information you have requested. My sincere apologies.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: bernard
Comments: hey dude
u a fan of squarepusher??

MY ANSWER:
Fan, no. Appreciate some of his work? Yes

Up to May 2005

YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Peter
Comments: I was wondering how you can play upright at such loud volumes without losing clarity and gaining a lot of feedback. Is it your pickup or very good positioning of the bass?

MY ANSWER:
That's a problem I have to deal with on a nightly basis. It often has a lot to do with the room and the positioning. Every room is different and what the stage is made of, what the shape of the room is, how low the ceiling is--are all variable factors. My stage volume isn't usually very loud to be quite honest, but when I play with my trio, for instance (probably the loudest I ever play my upright) I use a volume pedal so I can ride the volume. And I never have bass in my monitor. In fact, I usually try to have nothing in my monitor. I don't have the fanciest pick-up (it's an Underwood; costs about $130) but I've had it for years and I love it. I always try to get the most natural (un-amplified) sound possible. I've found that checking my tone while bowing, and EQ-ing from there works best. Tone is also something that comes with practice, calluses and finger strength.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: I have a question. I've had a bass for about 7 years but have never lived close to anywhere I can get lessons, so far I have taught myself everything I know (which is not that much). I finally got over playing in lame-ass metal bands and started to search for the weird and wonderful in music, ... I feel a need to make music for myself that I am proud of but I have absolutely no understanding of music theory or anything similar. Can you suggest some approaches, or texts, that would help me out? ...anything you can offer can increase my knowledge so I can one day write an entire piece of music and be musically happy. Thanks.

MY ANSWER:
First off, you should know that you don't necessarily NEED theory in order to write great music. Your ear is the most valuable tool you have. I would suggest learning stuff off recordings. Bass parts, guitar parts, keyboard, whatever. Start with one song. Or one part of a song that you really like. Why study something that you are not interested in? I stopped studying Mozart scores after college (that's what they MADE me study) and started checking out Shostakovich and Stravinsky, for example, because that's what I like to hear!)
That said, knowing some theory will only make you stronger. There are a million different books on the subject, some of which I've mentioned in these pages, but it really depends on which direction you want to go. Since you mentioned Tomahawk I'm guessing that you enjoy the stylings of Duane Denison. He definitely knows his theory. He knows a lot of traditional country and jazz. Look, why don't you track him down? --he lives in Nashville-- and ask him for a lesson. I'm not kidding. It's not impossible.
In the meantime, study the stuff you like. You want to write a great song? Study the shit out of a great song: it's form, it's harmony, the shape of it's melody....And start with a basic theory book. Good luck!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Pete
Comments: Trevor, I thought in old MB interviews at least Mike may have noted he was never a fan of Zappa when asked of Franks influence. Was Zappa an influence for you back then? How does it come about that Terry Bozzio becomes the fill in for Dave in Fantomas this year? (what is the connection, and who brought him into the band?). Does the band have a different feel with Terry filling in, or does he just play the parts?

MY ANSWER:
A lot of people used to assume that Zappa was an influence on Bungle. Though we did consider him for producing our first record he was never really a musical influence. In fact, I got into Zappa and Beefheart much later, after people told me that Bungle sounded like they had listened to that stuff. I still don't really understand why people think that. Maybe it's the pottie humor. I appreciate him as a musician and composer but I don't think his style is remotely related to where Bungle was coming from.
Buzz met Bozzio through a mutual friend so that's the connection. In my opinion, yes, the feel is completely different. More on that later....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Mike
Comments: I was just wondering, do you ever read music when you play live? If so, with what groups?
MY ANSWER:
yes, all the time, with lots of different groups. In fact, I read with most bands that I play with.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Richard Rock
Comments: hi trev. im Rich a musician from a small river side town called Gravesend in kent,uk. Im known as a very skillfull guitarist of 15 years and also as a drummer and electronic music producer. like yourself im into so many musical styles and could never just make one kind of music or play just one instrument but im 25 now and getting on in my years and still have not made it in the music world. i dont know if i should stick to my guns and hope my multi skills are noticed one day or just sell out and play some mindless shit and make some fast cash like every other sucker in the london rock scene. help me out and advize me trev! p.s your last fantomas gig at the london astoria was your best!!! i smoked some sweet sweet green in the crowd and felt like your rubbling bass was gonna kill me!! i almost collapsed! nice one!
MY ANSWER:
I would stick it out only if it's something you have to do. I'm still sticking it out. I have, by no means, "made it" in the music world. I do it because it's my destiny and I know it. I mean, you've invested this much time into it, why stop now? What are you gonna do, work at a bookstore? By the way, the more sweet green you smoke, the more you'll sit around wondering what you should do.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: pbr
Comments: Hey Trevor. Loved the Denver Ipecac show. What did you think of the "pre-show" out front? Question. Do you ever think about the chance of being physically harmed by some psychotic Mr. Bungle fan. After that whole "Dimebag" Darrell incident I actually thought of you and Patton quite a bit, with the whole official Bungle breakup. I've met some pretty strange
characters who view the first Bungle album as some sort of  living, breathing, vital part of their existence. Jesus, it was almost 15 years ago. Grow
up! Anyway, just wondered if it had ever crossed your mind.

MY ANSWER:
Yeah, Denver. Friends Forever rule! Best show ever (that I've seen anyway).
So, Dimebag. Yeah, I've met some scary weirdos, but I try not to piss anyone off precisely for that reason. You never know who you're crossing. I'm in enough trouble already playing the music that I play. So, to answer your question, yes...yes I do think about being physically harmed now and then.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: enrique terrones
Comments: howdy. first off im a big fan and would really appreciate a response, though i understand if there isnt one. ok with that out of the way.. i used to like incubus, incubus! i was a little younger and more gulible (give me a break im 18, revalations are new still). my questions are.. is brandon boyd really a pretentious cocksucker? i know you played a few shows with them once. you dont have to say pretentious cocksucker, only if you want.. also i have this home studio that can put out damn decent quality demos, is 10 - 15 bucks an hour decent to charge people?

MY ANSWER:
I never met that Incubus guy. But here's a story. One day he was walking around with some kind of ab-slider machine or something. You know, working on his abs, keeping that 6-pack. But he was WALKING AROUND with it. Someone asked him what it was and he told them it was his road managers. Ha Ha. Right. He liked to take his shirt off a lot.

$10-15/hr is damn cheap. Damn cheap. It's really a matter of what your time is worth.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: hi trevor. i went to the fantomas's mexico city show. my brother and i were sitting on the curb outside the venue and said hi to you through the window and you waved back...cool. anyway. is it true that you're coming back to mexico? maybe even to monterrey? a couple questions. what did you think of the whole mexico city experience? and have you ever thought of singin/yelling along with playing bass in a band? you do that a little bit with fantomas, bungle and even guested with the melvins in that kiss cover song. what about it?

MY ANSWER:
Me gusta Ciudad de Mexico. Locos. We had a great 36 hours there. Ate worms and ant eggs. Totally crazy crowd. I hope we go back, but no plans that I know of.
Yes, I think soon I'll start singing in a band. Some new concoction. My voice sucks but who cares.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Chris
Comments: Hey, i like what you've got going here (and of course, I am a fan of your music). I think it's great that you're available to answer questions, in one way or another...so here are mine:
1) what do you think of two-hand tapping on the bass? I'd never really encountered it until a freind got me into tech-metal (specifically 'Only Ash Remains' by Necrophagist), and I'm curious as to your thoughts on the technique (in general)
2) What do you think of computer music? (When I say computer music, I mean composers such as Iannis Xenakis, Brad Garton, Rodney Waschka, David Behrman, Larry Austin, Carla Scaletti, and so on...)
Thanks for the music!!!

MY ANSWER:
Two hand tapping is soooooo 1988. There are certain things that can be done tastefully with that technique but not many. And I really don't think it has anyplace in metal. Especially on bass. Christ! Fuck that LimpBiskit white funk metal shit. I don't spend anytime on it. I'm still into the old fashioned techniques.
yes, I dig some computer music, but I could almost say the exact same thing about it. It has to be done carefully to be good. Xenakis certainly has some great stuff. But again, I tend to prefer electro-acoustic if I'm going to go that route. Pierre Henry, Luc Ferrari, etc.....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jeremy Southern
Comments: Hi Trevor. I recently discovered a musician known as Magicicada. I noticed that you had a show with him on March 9th in Chattanooga, Tennessee. I missed it,unfortunatly. How did that show go? What bands played that night, or was it a collaboration? Hope to hear from you.......Jeremy.

MY ANSWER:
He did a short set opening up for Shelley and I. Quite nice. He's from Atlanta.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: I am currently studying post romantic and early 20th music. I was wondering what scales/modes do you like to use (such as octatonic, whole tone, lydian flat 7, 12 tone serialism or any other synthetic scales). I was also wondering if you could list a few examples from ANY of your recorded projects in which you use any of these scales? Thank you for your time.

MY ANSWER:
yes, I use all that shit whenever appropriate. I'm still writing that article in Guitar World's Bass Player magazine and I've talked about some of that stuff in previous issues. The song Phlegmatics I wrote is based entirely on a 12-tone row. In Electric Masada I use a couple of klezmer scales based on the harmonic minor scale (one is like a dorian with a #4). When it comes to composing I may use any number of pre-determined scales. Or, like Cecil Taylor says, why not make up your own scales? Have you checked out Messiaen's modes of limited transposition?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Olie NcLean
Comments: Hail, segnor Trevor, I love your work, particularly the naturalism you sometimes achieve amidst the context of cerebral devices. The question I would most like to ask of you would be: When composing, do you write best for an ensemble, or do you write music that you adapt to the capacities/strengths of the ensemble? Furthermore, what sort of ensemble (Size? Instrumentation?) do you write best with/for?

MY ANSWER:
It's often easier to have an ensemble and even specific players in mind. I don't mean easier, I just mean you know what you're writing for--maybe it's easier to imagine. Anyway, my ideas usually start with a specific ensemble in mind. However, I also write down any idea that comes to mind and apply them later. Sometimes one gets bogged down by orchestration before the ideas are solidified. On the contrary, sometimes one gets bogged down by notes before the concept is solidified.
As I educated myself and grow more confident the idea of the expanding ensemble appeals to me. Right now I mostly deal with small (2-6 piece) groups. Any instrumentation I decide to use is comfortable as long as I know the limits. Blatter's orchestration book is a must-have.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Hey Trevor,
have you ever tried using gov't grants to get your music off the ground? i know people like zorn have used them to get started, and playing the kind of music that you do, you're completely aware of the damn near impossibility of paying rent and touring at the same time. If you have any suggestions, this starving artist would love to hear them!

MY ANSWER:
Sadly, I have no experience in grants. It's something worth diving into though. I know people to are grant careerists. I like the idea of the ones that allow you to work in residence abroad. Let me know what you find out!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: L. Ignacio Rojas
Comments: Hello Trevor:
My name is Ignacio and I’m from Mexico... I would like to ask you a couple of things. First, somehow, some of you (you and I think M. Patton) seem to be attached to the surrealism aesthetics, I would like to know what is your personal approach to it, do you feel that your music has a like with Lautreamont, Breton or Daly and Buñuel et. al. or do you think that surrealism is for you a truly theoretical premise for the development of your own music? I ask this because your own statements about Breton and maybe because Mr Bungle music sometimes sounded to me like a soundtrack of Daly paintings and Fantomas music like the soundtrack for a Baudelaire poem I guess. Second, mmm, I read that you have a Mexican friend and that you like Mexican food and that you are trying to learn Spanish. M Patton talks quite good Spanish, even Mexican Spanish I would say, and I saw on the Ipecac site a picture of Fantomas on the studio with a Mexican flag, so I would like to ask you, what is your relationship with “Mexicanship”, so to speak, music or art maybe, don’t know, for example, in California album there was a pretty obvious Bossa Nova kind of music, so perhaps, is there something that you like from Mexican culture? If not, forget about it, maybe it is my own wonderings. Well, thank you very much if you take the time to read and answer all this. Never change. Yours  Ignacio

MY ANSWER:
I'm not sure if there is a direct link between my affinity of surrealist art and my creative output of music. I can only say that I find most subversive art appealing. It's hard to say how I might translate looking at an Ernst collage, or reading an Aragon essay, for example, into a song structure. It's really just a mentality. I like things that don't make sense. I like symbolism and metaphor.
I have taken the time to research the actual movements of Surrealism and Dadaism and though I don't agree with or love everything about them, I think there are some historical similarities. Turbulent times birthing frustration, angst and revolt.

As a Mexican you should know that Bossa Nova originated in Brazil, si? Anyway, I grew up in California. Lots of Mexicans. I decided to try to learn some Spanish. I love lots of kinds of foods, Mexican being one of them. I'm also a big fan of Chavela Vargas. And, of course, pienso que latinas son muy caliente! Ay! Que rica! Viva la raza!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Karl
Location: Malta
Comments: Hello Mr. Dunn, If possible, could you please answer the following questions? :
a) Do you know anything about the twelve tone technique, aka
dodecaphony? (I ask because I am interested in becoming a composer)
b) Do you belive in forgiveness?
Thank you.
MY ANSWER:
a)If you want to know about twelve-tone music I suggest checking out the guy who came up with it: Arnold Schoenberg. And while your at it, two of his students: Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Schoenberg was pretty strict about this technique and both of these students took his teachings to their own unique levels. Webern's scores, in fact, are great for studying that stuff.
b)yes. But I still have a hard time not holding grudges and grinding my teeth all through the night.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Mike Doherty
Comments: My question is; You've made a career of playing alot of music that really stretches the art form. While I'm certainly not familiar with your entire discography, and in an effort not to pigeon-hole you as an "avant-garde" musician by any means, I wonder, are you at all into anything that could coarsely fall into the "singer-songwriter" catagory? I know you've recorded with Tom Waits, and you also write poetry. Is this type of music something that still, if ever, interests you?
MY ANSWER:
yes it does. I find the "traditional song form" a challenge in itself. It's simplicity, it's story-telling, it's succinctness. One of these days I'll get paid shitloads of money for writing great songs that generations will whistle to and re-record. The publishing money will come raining down. Until then I'll keep singing Willie Nelson songs to my girlfriend in the privacy of our 400 sq.ft. apt.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Thom Krone
Comments: Trevor, I picked up the Trevor Dunn / Shelley Burgen duet CD and I am blown away - I know that you are based on the East Coast and all of your shows with her have been that way, but I was wondering if you are planning on hitting Denver with her, because I am in love with the tunes. Also I got a question about Electric Masada - are we going to get a real studio album from those guys (I mean you were bragging about the Masada II songbook not too long ago - lucky bastard, I can only imagine) and hopefully some type of tour?  Also now that Mr. Bungle is dead - I bet you are happy to get on with your life and quit being pestered about Bungle questions (when is the new album coming out? are you touring? will you guys cover "Afternoon Delight"? how about playing my bar mitzvah?, so is it a relief or are you being hounded by "why don't you get back together queries?" now? Hope that this finds you well and that everything is going fine in your own little world.

MY ANSWER:
Shelley and I don't have any immediate plans to get to Denver. We did a tour of the South East last year and are planning on releasing one of the shows. Thanks for liking it!

I believe that Electric Masada may work on a studio record at the end of this year. No promises.

Bungle is dead and I'm happy about it. Someday I'll publish a book of our history with never before seen photos, all the dirty facts, and maybe a disc of unreleased tracks. Until then, you need to stop thinking about it.


YOUR QUESTION:
Comments: hey trevor, I was really happy i got to see the trio in detroit. I wanted to ask u something. first have u ever played a night and the people there just stare at u cuz they dont get it? cuz my band gets that alot cuz are sets are one big song. if so what do u do? second if u ever play detroit again i would love to just sit back and jam with you. thanks for you music and your time -Jesus-

MY ANSWER:
As someone who has been performing live since 1982 I'd have to say I've played to MANY audiences that could do nothing but stare. I've had coins thrown at me, I've been heckled and snubbed, threatened and spat upon. What do I do? I ignore it. I focus on the music. If you are distracted your music will suffer. I'm there to play music--bottom line.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Hi Trevor ...
1. If I wrote to you via Ipecac Recordings would you send me a letter back?
2. I have noticed that whilst answering some questions on this site, you give some people pretty harsh answers ( ie fuck you, you don't know anything.) Do you ever stop and think afterwards that these people are big fans of yours and it might seriously bum them out to get an answer like that from you? In ALL seriousness I know that if I got an answer like 'fuck you' from you I'd be pretty miserable. Thankyou, hope to see you in Aus shortly :)

MY ANSWER:
1)yes--you can also write directly to my p.o. box. You'd get a quicker response that way
2)if you read carefully, you dumbfuck, you will notice that my harsh answers are directed at harsh questions. some people want to be verbally abused and it's all in good fun anyway. People who ask me serious, thoughtful questions tend to get answers that attempt an equal quality. So get off your fucking high-horse... No, I'm kidding. I appreciate any and all inquiries, responses, feedback and attention. Believe me, I really do. Plus it's super easy to sit here behind my computer, staring at a bunch of text and be completely impersonal. It also helps to get out my aggressions and keep from grinding my teeth all night. I honestly don't think you'd be miserable if I said "fuck you". Maybe to your face; that might actually hurt your feelings. Are you, like, 12?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
Comments: Im trying to start an ethnic, klezmer, balkan, eastern european project but im having a hard time finding good recordings and sheet music do you know of any cds books info etc that might help me ?

MY ANSWER:
I don't get it. Where have you heard this music? Well, anyway, there are TONS of recordings. Any decent record store would have klezmer, and balkan sections. Sheet music is another question because most of that stuff is considered "folk" music. In other words it isn't high-brow composed music. Also a lot of it is actually improvised over traditional forms that have been passed down aurally over the years. There are klezmer fake books so that you could learn certain chord progressions and melodies as you would a jazz tune. Some smart-alecs, like Bartok, actually transcribed stuff. He has volumes of Hungarian melodies that you might be able to find in a public library. Also, I know that here in Brooklyn, on Atlantic, there is a Middle Eastern music store that has sheet music--so I would suggest "specialty" stores like that. Sorry I can't be more specific


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Roger Doger
Comments: Cronenberg or Verhoven? What do you think of Kubrick?

MY ANSWER:
Oh, man I love Cronenberg. Damn Canadian. And who can argue with Clockwork Orange or 2001? I mean, you just can't argue. But then there was that Tom Cruise pile of crap. You know, Tom Cruise is gay and the Scientologists have video footage of him with a young boy. They've got him by the balls, so to speak. i don't understand why he can't just be gay. I mean, will his career really suffer that much? It's not like he needs the money.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Hi Trevor, at the age of 28 i'm wondering if what i'm doing now makes sense -like most probably do. i've had bands till about 5 years ago, made lots of music and then cut it down because of a) not finding musicians here in munich, b) because of my jobs in conceptual design. ever since i'm missing the singing and the bands. i think i'm a band kind of person -can't discipline myself to do songs alone but with a band i could practice 16 hours a day, still being enthusiastic. now why i'm writing is because i'm not sure of if all i'm saying is an excuse for not having the 'drive' to get music done by myself or because i really need the people. does one necessarily have to be able to do it all by himself, too? And nr. 2 is if it's all about the people you work with -are there local differences concerning music scenes? If i want to go back to singing and do nothing else than that, does it make sense to relocate, and if yes, where to? (i would go anywhere) (and no, we don't have open stages, much life music here in munich..) why i'm writing is i'm trying to figure out if i'm blaming the city and missing people for the missing drive  (which i never felt missing when in a band) in me or if the reasons could be true and if yes what to do against. it feels as if i'd be missing my life as long as i'm not singing most sincere thanks for any comments and help,

MY ANSWER:
It may be helpful for you to get out of Munich. Berlin is happening, right? Or New York City, of course. Many cities go through flux. San Francisco is classic for that. There are waves of energy and then dry spells of transition. Plus, Munich, like SF, is actually quite small so I think finding a place where there are like-minded people and where there is more competition would be a positive move on your part. I mean, what's more important to you, the city of Munich, or not "missing your life"?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: wayman tisdale
Comments: Y'know that new Fantomas song that goes "se-ha-me-ha...se-ha-me" or whatever? You guys attempted it a 2 times before Patton jokingly yelled "It's in four!!!" I didn't notice anything wrong with the first 2 attempts. I am a musical-thoery-retardendo but is it safe to say that what makes it such a mind-fuck is the fact that the vocals overlap somehow? When I
listen to it in headphones I try to just do the picking hand(bass) I find I have to ignore the vocals to even come close to getting it right. How do you tacklethis chunk of Patton-genius? Dumb question I know.

MY ANSWER:
Ok, firstly, it's not really that "genius". I have a problem with that term....Anyway, the riff I think you are referring to is actually in 7/4 not 4/4. Patton doesn't really know the difference even though he wrote it. When we played this tune in Montreal I became distracted by the ghost on stage (I'm not kidding) and started playing the thing in 6/4. Stupid poltergeist. It would have been fine to continue but one certain band leader had the need to ridicule me on stage. Oh well. So, I just play along with the sample which is also in 7, and I don't really bother listening to the vocals. I can't recall whether they actually overlap or what....

But since you mention it, there certainly are times when I have to block out someone else's part in order to stay solid, especially when polyrhythms are involved. Incidentally there are few, if any, polyrhythms in Fantomas. Odd meters, yes; Tempo changes, yes; but no polyrhthms.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Happiness 3.14159...
Comments: In the true spirit of being REDUNDANT...
Have you seen Sin City? Would Fantomas make another Director's Cut record just with themes from Sin City? Will Mr. Bungle release a greatest hits album i.e. a Girls of Porn single?

MY ANSWER:
I saw Sin City twice. Jessica Alba rules. She's my new Britney. Fantomas will most likely never repeat a concept. Mr Bungle will not release a greatest hits album, mostly because we never had any.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jimminy
Comments: Appreciate this little site you have going here. Anytime a web page has a black-colored background, I can only feel a sense of pride that my black t-shirt wardrobe is enabled by such
a worthwhile symbiosis of music and color.
3 questions:
1. Where do you get the inspiration for your song titles?
2. Who gets the more desperate groupies; Fantomas or the Trio?
3. Would you ever sing on your own records, just to piss off Patton?

MY ANSWER:
1)Song titles come to me all the time. I hear them, read them, or just think them up. I have a huge list of them waiting for the appropriate music. 2)The only groupies I have EVER seen are lanky, pimply teenage boys. Patton gets a lot which is fine with me; while he's signing autographs I can sneak behind onto the bus and put my pajamas on. The trio gets total weirdo jazzbos who want to give us free pens. I have never in my life witnessed a "desperate" groupie. Lucky me. 3)I will sing on my own record someday but it will be for artistic reasons. If I wanted to piss off Patton I would put his phone number and address on this website. I could do it, you know...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Chad Mckinney
Comments: First off I'd like to say thank you for all the music... I have a question about a fantomas show I saw about a year ago in austin texas at stubbs. During the middle of the show everyone went off stage, then you and buzz came out and starting droning on a powerchord for what seemed about 3 minutes , then mike and dave came out and started playing something I
had never heard. I thought it was going to be on the new fantomas album (which kicks ass by the way) but its not. So I was wondering if you wrote it, or if it was cut or maybe it was a cover? also, if you could pick one composer in all of time to study with alive or dead, who would it be and why?

MY ANSWER:
1)that's a Fantomas song that has never been put on a record. We did record it but I guess Patton didn't want to put it on either of the last two CDs. It has the working title "Trance".
2)hmmmm. great fucking question, man. Best question ever in the history of my website. You win the prize. My first thought is Messiaen because he was a great educator who produced a lot of great composers and I love just about every piece he's ever written. Or I'd possibly say Ravel. Incredible orchestrator. Those French guys and their orchestration....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Wade
Comments: now i remember! do you know where to find the "FireCracker" movie w/patton? forgive me for asking about someone else on your site, i know its, rude.

MY ANSWER:
Damn straight it's rude. You can kiss my ass. I don't know, don't care, don't want to see it, don't care if you see it, don't care what you think about it if you do see it.


YOUR QUESTION:
Location: Sitka,Alaska
Comments: 1.do you paint or do any other art form besides music? if so, ide love to see whatever it might be. (maybe post some up on this site?) thanks for your time -wade-

MY ANSWER:
I was actually into drawing even before music. I still do it once in a while and I flirt around with water colors and what not. I won't be posting any of it. I don't have time to refine it as a craft. It's just a personal past-time.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: McCormack
Comments: Maybe you can't answer this but I'll ask anyway: it seems to me that Ipecac CDs smell different than any other CD i buy. Do you know why that is? Is there some additive they throw into the CDs before packaging? Thanks. Come back to Canada soon.

MY ANSWER:
You are absolutely right. I cannot answer that question.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Don Pettit
Comments: my question is...What are your thoughts of doing a bass playing instructional video??...cause yer definately a little far away and too busy to take on another student, hahaha, if you DO end up doing one I'd definately pick one up, cause really...if you can learn from yer main influence, what more can you ask for!

MY ANSWER:
I thought about doing one, but it would be more about fire and butoh dance then about playing the bass. I would be holding the bass all wrong and teaching really bad habits and there would be sand, and paper lamps and candies. I'd have midgets cutting me with knives and hot chicks snorting cocaine. Then some monkeys would come out and do their thing. And I'd be like, yeah man, check out this festered 9th chord. Then I'd say, here's lick #43 and I'd play something totally vague and horrible. And Spiderman would be in the corner with a milkshake. Thanks for buying it in advance!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jeff
Comments: Hey Trevor, i play guitar, and recently got a bass just to mess around, i have really gotten into bungle in the past week and i'm seeing fantomas this saturday, haha i have the dumbest question ever, well 2,
1) can we meet up after the show, maybe show me a thing or two about bass seeing as i love it more than guitar, but i'm decently good at guitar (i'm definately not expecting an answer on these, or a yes, on account of it's 2 days from now, and that's just a dumb question)
2)i like bass more, as i've said, and i was wondering how long until i can become a pretty decent bassist, my friend has been playing for 2 years, and he can play any primus song, and he's a "slap god" he can hold a conversation playing just about any primus song... Thanks

MY ANSWER:
1)Well, I'd would have been happy to meet up and talk bass. Unfortunately that time has long passed. These questions go up, then they get sent to me, then they sit around for a while, then it takes me about a week to answer each question. But I'm pretty approachable out there in the real world. 2)I would think that just about any half-wit could hold a conversation whilst pooping out a Primus "bass line". I'm not into that poppy poopy stuff. My first piece of advice would be to not waste anytime learning it. If you want to hear some real slapping check out Larry Graham. How long it takes just depends on how much time you put in and how good you want to get. I think hitting your instrument at least a little bit EVERY DAY will show quick results.

A lot of what makes a bass player good has to do with his/her compatibility with the drummer (or other instruments). So just sitting around playing DRUMS on the bass won't get you a lot of gigs. Ok ok, Les can play some tricky stuff while talking over it. Who cares? Heard it back in the 80s. Done with it.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: zack crackerjack the mack
Comments: hey what made you want to write music over doing something eles in life?

MY ANSWER:
I'm not sure. At a young age I just knew I didn't want a 9-5 job and I wanted to be in a band like KISS (When I was 10 I wanted to be in a band that was bigger than KISS by the time I was 12). The more I got into it, the more I knew I made the right choice and had endless things to learn.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: beto
Comments: I've been playing bass for about 10 years, and I have never taken a music lesson in my life, I've taugh myself how to play mainly by ear, so do you think that after 10 years of playing I need to take lessons? or should I just keep learning by ear? Thanx for your time, Un gran admirador
de su trabajo.

MY ANSWER:
It depends. You may find that by taking a lesson a whole new world will open up to you. Why NOT take a lesson? I still take them, if for no other reason than the humility/inspiration. Can you teach yourself more just by ear? Probably. Will it hurt to take a lesson? Doubtful. What would you ask a teacher? You may want to go into a lesson with a few specific requests. Y Gracias por sus admiracion.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Adam
Comments: Hi Trevor. I'm a bass player and big fan of Bungle, Fantomas, and what little i've heard of your solo work. What do you think of Buckethead? Do you know him? Any possible collaborations? Also, what's the difference between a duck?

MY ANSWER:
I think Buckethead knows how to play the guitar. I just wish he'd do something less cheesy. I do know him. I know who he is. Does that make you want to touch me? The difference between a duck is it's bone structure.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Random Fan
Comments: Hey Trevor, I just wanted to say I drove down to Phoenix from Vegas to see the show you played on the 31st with Fantomas and Trio Convulsant and it was fantastic. In my opinion Trio Convulsant stole the show, I was amazed with some of the stuff you all did with your instruments. Anyway I had a question, It sounded like you did a few songs that were not on Sister Phantom Owl Fish, is there any way you would remember what they were and how I could get a hold of a recording of them? They were very good. Thanks for your time, and for putting on an awesome show.

MY ANSWER:
Thanks for your comments. The other songs we played were from my first trio-convulsant record. They were "Ann-Margret" and "Equation of the Found Object". Apparently that record is difficult to find. I think you can still find it on line...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Rednaxel
Comments: I saw trio convulsant open for Fantomas last night, and have to say I enjoyed the trio more! There was something very new and 'modern' about the style. It may just be that I listen to too much King Crimson, but there were several moments that it came to mind while listening to your show. Would you guys say that Fripp is an influence at all?

MY ANSWER:
He is but not in the way you might think. Well, I was really into that Discipline record but other than that, Fripp has some pretty intense theories on technique. He's really into efficiency of movement and not wasting energy. I've used some of his methods in my own left hand technique.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Brandi
Comments: Sister Phamtom Owl Fish... Random words that sound good together? Or is there a meaning? Do you have any special feelings on... randomness? (now I know why I've never asked a question here.) What are your thoughts on people who seem to only be at shows to take pictures? I saw the show in Austin last night- fantastic!- and, at times I felt that I was in a sea of cameras. Does it break your concentration to have all those flashes in your face?

MY ANSWER:
The title is taken from a surreal novella. The camera thing doesn't usually bother me. I rarely even notice the audience. I just concentrate on the music. I'm not sure what people do with those pictures. Do they look at them?

YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jason Boswell
Comments: have you found pitch harmonics on bass to be usefull in any situation at all? Thanks for your time.

MY ANSWER:
I'm not sure what you mean by the word "pitch". All harmonics have pitch. I usually just refer to them as either natural harmonics or artificial harmonics (which are not actually artificial). But to answer your question, yes, I use harmonics all the time especially on upright where I find them rich and colorful and particularly "vocal" when played with the bow. I probably use this technique most often in improvisations.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Sam
Comments: Hello there Trevor. 'Sister Owl Fish'... Any relation to Topol's 'City Sister Silver'? What a great novel. Anyways, I'm a sucker for tracking down literary references. One more thing: Are you a Pynchon fan by any chance?

MY ANSWER:
There's a "phantom" in there....No relation to Topol but it IS a literary reference. Keep looking! Not a Pynchon fan. I tried to read Vineland twice and failed.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Fraser
Comments: Hey trev. There's this girl at my work that I'm trying to get to like me, but she isn't responding (at least not the way I'd like, nudge, nudge, wink, wink...). I thought since you're a wack job like her you might have some useful love advice. Ever done anything crazy to impress a girl, other that being a brilliant musician?

MY ANSWER:
Jesus, yeah, ME with the love advice. I would say, just be yourself. Either you're attractive to her or your not. Actually, stay away from girls, they're just a distraction from practicing.

When I was a kid I used to play Evel Knievel and build a ramp to jump Big Wheels with my bicycle. Once this girl came by and I tried to impress her with my finesse. Unfortunately I got over-excited and in mid-air pulled on the handle bars too much. I ended up flat on my back on the asphalt crying like a baby.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Matthew Muad'Dib
Comments: have you ever masturbated to phantoms at three in the morning near a Colorado lakeside?

MY ANSWER:
Phantoms don't really get me off. They kinda scare me actually. But lakes! Now there's somethin'...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: gray
Comments: heres a good question...have you heard of the band Gruvis Malt? if you have, what do you think of them?

MY ANSWER:
No, that's a pretty awful question.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Shane
Comments: Hey, Trevor. I was curious as to how the writing process for Fantomas's Delerium Cordia was done. It says Mike Patton wrote all the material, but i have a hard time believing that. Did you have any say as to how this album was put together?

MY ANSWER:
Well, you better believe it cuz it's true. And no, I had nothing to do with the writing, arranging or sequencing. I just play the bass, man.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Derek
Comments: I am really curious how is groups like secret chiefs, mr bungle and such that you organize the music. Do you notate all the parts? Some of your music seems to complicated to just teach each other parts. I am very curious. Thanks

MY ANSWER:
Sometimes notated music was passed around; usually if it was a particularly difficult part to memorize. Other stuff was just taught to each other, or worked out in the rehearsal studio. Some stuff was completely arranged by one person. And yet other things were realized on the fly in the recording studio. No formula really.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: gus
Comments: Trevor, What effects do you use for live situations and in the studio? Also, why does poop stink? Answers to these question's would bring a certain amount of closure in my life.

MY ANSWER:
Live I just use distortion, some reverb on occasion, and once in a while some wah. In the studio it's generally the same but it depends. With Bungle I hardly used any effects. With Fantomas I use tons of crap in the studio. Most other stuff I do is effects-less. Poop stinks because it's got bad stuff in it. If you get any of it in your system you could get really sick and even die. Shit is bad. That's why it's important to get it out of you and to avoid it. The stink is a warning sign to stay away.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: mel adams
Comments: trevor, do you have the munty clown duck?

MY ANSWER:
No. What is that? A Korn action figure?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: don't
Comments: bitch, what are your prog rock influences?

MY ANSWER:
Rush: Moving Pictures and Permanent Waves. Too bad I stopped listening to that stuff in the 8th grade.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
Comments: After reading your Q & A, I have the following questions and
comments;
1) Even at his advanced age, Ivan Koloff and anybody could kick the ass of you and 20 Patton's, christ the MAN DEFEATED BRUNO SAMMARTINO FOR GODSAKES!!
Also, Koloff will not job (lose) for you, Bob is trying to set you up to get your ass kicked. Do not trust Bob. Hit him with a chair the first time
he turns his back on you.
2) I have the PLOP you need. What's in it for me?
3) Do you mind if I put some of your Bungle master tapes on ebay? Not all of them, just most. I'll kick you a %. Hell, you're 3000 miles away, Bungle is
dead, YOU DON'T NEED THEM!!! Mom needs closet space for my stuff. So you don't mind?
4) When will Bungle get back together? Think someday all the members of Bungle, The Melvins, and Fantomas will get together with Tom Waits for a collaboration and if so, will they come to Portugal?
5)I am sure knowing me as you do that you know that the only good Chili Peppers song I ever heard was Weird Al's Flintstone parody (which that idiot Flea didn't like)--why all the CP hate? Good story there?
6) I will rule you in Norwegian Flipperball. Best 2 0f 3, loser's woman no longer gets to be called Shelly. Game?
7) I see your fave drummers, bands, bassists---NO FUCKING KISS MENTIONED ANYWHERE---THE BAND THAT INSPIRED ME TO PLAY GUITAR WHICH IN TURN INSPIRED YOU (That's right, it's all about me) REMEMBER SPITTING UP FAKE BLOOD IN OUR ROOM FROM THE JOKE HOUSE? (Still there by the way) YOU LITTLE SHIT YOU HAVE LOST YOUR WAY WHERE ARE YOUR ROOTS? Damn, I'm glad I don't know KISS personally cuz the guys you put over them...EMBARRASSING!! KISS WAS THE FIRST CONCERT YOU EVER SAW (Thanks to me again) KISS RULES DAMN YOU!!!! BEG FORGIVENESS!!!! I DON'T CARE IF THEY ARE 50!!!! THEY STILL RULE ALL!!!!!
8) Do you think someday that Bungle might reunite and tour with KISS?
9) When it comes to deep philosophical questions, please come to me in the future. I can help. First came the UFOs. Then the chickens, which were one of the many species left by the UFOs. Then the egg. By the way, the chicken crossed the road cause he couldn't circle it.
10) What is with all this talk about your ass? And does Mike Patton know Felix? That could be a match.
11) I heard a rumor that Bungle was going to reunite with Felix replacing Trey. Any truth to that?

MY ANSWER:
Ladies and gentleman, my brother.
Yes, it's true it's true! Troy, you're the reason I started playing bass. There. Happy? You and that damn 45 of Detroit Rock City. By the way, who got you Andre the Giant's autograph, huh? WHO?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Patrick
Comments: Hi hi hi again, old friend. Or not. I was just curious as to your thoughts on artists like Heinonymous Bosch, Louis Wain, and variousother psychotic art would be.

MY ANSWER:
Bosch rules. Way before ANYONE. Speaking of psychotic, what about Adolf Wolfli? All artists are psychotic to some degree.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Campovsky
Comments:
1) What exactly was Lombardo's mistake at the end of the London Astoria gig the other night? I sure as hell didn't notice it! (great gig by the way)
2) What Kurzweil did you use on California? (you guys are completely insane for doing that album on analog!) Cheers duder, tonight's discovery (of this website) will make me happy for a long time, and trying to play the Dead Goon line will keep me BUSY for a long time!
p.s. i'm starting to practice like hell so i can be you for a one off bungle covers gig. we'll probably make the effort to dress up with masks and
silly clothes and whatnot, so what should i wear??! it doesn't have to be something you've worn, just something YOU say i should wear! (i don't care how ridiculous, so long as i can still move and see my hands!) thanks again you utter utter legend!

MY ANSWER:
1)I seem to remember that Lombardo forgot about the tag at the end of the song.2)We used the K2500. Yes we were STUPID to do that record analog. 3)You should dress up like Britney Spears dressed up like a nun.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Dirk
Comments: Hey Trevor, I'm assuming you still write quite a bit of music, do you have a backlog of stuff that you're waiting to release? I realize you've released a few already, would you stick to jazz or do you have "other" stuff that you'd like to work on and release? Perhaps it's too difficult to find the proper musicians? Thanks TD, keep up the great work!

MY ANSWER:
I don't really have a backlog of stuff that's already recorded. Most of the stuff I record ends up coming out within a year or so. Although I did a record with Ben Goldberg and Ellery Eskelin that never came out....In terms of stuff I write: yes, there are backlogs of backlogs. And it's not about finding musicians, it's about finding the time.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: J. Travis
Comments: A quick gear question; I was told recently that the secret to your Fantomas tone was that you always run through a Digitech Whammy shifted an octave down. While this sounds rather dubious to me, given the clarity of your tone with the band, I was just curious to hear straight from the source. Also, Is "Duck" Dunn really your father? If so, thats just too much seriously gifted bass palying for one household! Thanks for the excelent site!

MY ANSWER:
No, I don't use a wammy pedal. There is one song on the first Fantomas cd where I used one but I haven't been using it live at all. The secret to my tone on those records is simply that I have a nice P-bass.
"Duck" Dunn is NOT my father, at least not in the physical sense. But Carol Kaye is my mother.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: adam
Comments: Trevor, I met you in '99 in St. Pete FL. You were sitting out side the state theater reading a book about Willie Nelson. That was a cool moment for me. I just wanted to say thanks for changing my musical views forever and educating me on the value of energy. If you ever answer any more qusetions please answer these two.....how long was the recording process for SC3 "First Grand Constitution and By-laws"??? Have you heard the new stuff Trey has put out "Book of horizons" and what do you think???

MY ANSWER:
I have no idea how long Trey spent on "1st Grand...." My role was basically getting together with him and Danny and improvising. Little did I know a cd would come out of it. Haven't heard BOH.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: chad
Comments: what reading materials, movies, refreshing beverages would you use if people had been following you around agressively hypothosising (lieing) about you for five years.

MY ANSWER:
Hmmmm. I don't think they'd be any different than what I would read, watch or drink if people weren't lying about me. I don't think I would care. I don't think they would care.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Robbie
Comments: G'day from Australia Trevor.....Earlier this afternoon, I attended a workshop hosted by Clinton(Bär) McKinnon, and forgot to ask him the question I've been so longing the answer for. What are your eating habits before playing a gig and why? Fruit? Pasta? Peanuts? Sushi? Other? I'm dying to know. Thanks

MY ANSWER:
As long as I can get SOMETHING to eat, which is not always the case, I'm fine. I wouldn't say I have any particular habit in that department other than trying not to constantly eat the shit that is back stage: i.e. potato chips, cheese, processed meat by-products, beer...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Goodbyesoberday
Comments: Reeeeeeeeeeeespect...good show at the markethall there......but why only 1 tiny little innocent extra song???...do you hate germany soooo much???....

MY ANSWER:
yeah, I'm not a big fan of Germany. But, regardless of what I think, I don't decide what or how long to play on Fantomas tours.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: jeff malone
Comments: Trevor do you still have the nh licence plate "bungle" I sent to you 4 years ago? I want it back. Jeff Malone

MY ANSWER:
It's somewhere. You can't have it. I think I'm going to give it to Buzz so he can decorate his bathroom with it.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Gaga Yaba
Comments: Just wondering if you were a fan of Mr. St Hamm and or Victor Wooten?

MY ANSWER:
absolutely not. I hate that showboating, over-thought, soulless NOODLING. It's not the bass. It's not music. It's utter acrobatics. I started playing music partially in order to get away from those jock-strap apes. Fuckers.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: NATHAN WILLIAMS
Comments: um mr dunn ... didu ever try yoga and did u like it ?

MY ANSWER:
I tried it once. It hurt. I didn't like it. Now I'm fat.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Hi Mr. Dunn,
I'd like to buy my first upright but the thing is I'm a lefthanded; so what's my options considering the fact that I'll probably would not be able to sell it years later?

MY ANSWER:
Why are you worried about selling it? Are you planning on quitting before you've actually started? I don't know how many lefty bassists there are out there, but I'm sure there are a handful. You're not THAT much of a freak. Maybe you should just buy a good bass and not sell it.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: fetus
Comments: TREVOR do you know where I can find any Bungle tabs/sheet music (other than CV)?

MY ANSWER:
I sure don't. No books were ever published. No one cared. Maybe you should transcribe it yourself and then publish a book.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Conor
Comments: I noticed that at the geek show in december last year, you and a few of the other guys were using line 6 effects. I know they are extremely versatile pedals, but i've heard they are prone to breaking down and their customer "service" is pretty shitty. Before i blow $600 (australian) on these puppies, i wanted an opinion from you as to how they go on the road.

MY ANSWER:
you are right. I have been using Line6 pedals and they ARE prone to breaking. One of the "stomp buttons" came off mine and it's impossible to put it back on. I've also heard from other people that they've had problems. Other than that I haven't had much trouble. I like what they do but I'm not really one to endorse ANY product.

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